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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS), sometimes known by the name of its primary governing body, Single Action Shooting Society (SASS), is half-shooting sport, half-costume event, and all fun.  I’m not a CAS shooter myself, so I asked my friend Biloxi Bob to point me in the right direction, and helped me figure out how easy it is to get started with it.  Come along on my journey! Thanks for the help.

Cowboy Action Shooting: The Ultimate Guide

Cowboy Action Shooting: The Ultimate GuideTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS), sometimes known by the name of its primary governing body, Single Action Shooting Society (SASS), is half-shooting sport, half-costume event, and all fun.  I’m not a CAS shooter myself, so I asked my friend Biloxi Bob to point me in the right direction, and helped me figure out how easy it is to get started with it.  Come along on my journey! Thanks for the help. Bob! CAS is a multigun sport with pistols, rifles, and shotguns.  Unlike modern 3-gun, though, all of the guns are based on late-1800s designs, and shooters must wear period-correct clothing and accessories. And aliases.  Shooters use aliases.  (Biloxi Bob’s real name isn’t actually Biloxi Bob.  Sorry if that ruins the magic for you.) What’s all that mean, and how can you get in on it?  Read on to find out. Getting Started with "Cowboy Action Shooting" The Single "Action Shooting Society" provides the rules and support for almost all Cowboy Action Shooting around the world.  They also host national and world championship matches for the sport at Founder’s Ranch . SASS is the main governing body for most Cowboy Action matches around the country. By being a member of SASS and shooting at SASS-affiliated clubs, you’ll get the benefit of having the same rules apply at every match, with perhaps some minor variations to account for the range where a match is held. But more importantly, SASS membership allows you to register your alias.  That’s a unique name you’ve picked that is Old West in flavor.  Nobody is allowed to use an alias that is too similar to somebody else’s, so you’ll be the only one known by that name.  Choose wisely. There’s a big element of creativity and humor in aliases, and that’s a big part of the fun in CAS.  Over time, you’ll find that you will use your alias for all things CAS-related and might not even know the real-world names of your new shooting friends. Active SASS members not only get their special alias, they get an actual badge, a subscription to the Cowboy Chronicle magazine, the right to shoot in special matches like state, regional, national, and world championships, and other benefits. You don’t need to join SASS right when you get started, but the sooner you do, the sooner you can become the new Cowboy or Cowgirl you. Finding a Cowboy Action Match Regardless of whether you join SASS, you’ll want to hit up their website to find a club in your area . Once you find a local club, check on their website and reach out to their contact.  You’ll want to know when their regular matches are held, and whether they run new shooter workshops or clinics to get people like you up to speed. Unlike some of the other shooting sports, it’s a good idea to watch a CAS match or two before you dive in.  That’s because the equipment and rules are a little more complicated, especially for those of us who don’t have a lot of experience with all of the period firearms that are used. The best part about going to a match just to watch is that the experienced shooters there will almost always be happy to help you understand the game and help you get set up for your first time.  If you stick around until the end of the day, they might even let you try some of their guns – possibly on an actual stage! If you can’t get to a match, though, at least watch a few videos beforehand to help prepare. </c Cowboy Action Gear Like other multigun sports, there’s a lot of gear you need for CAS – and most people won’t have all of it up front.  Fortunately, you don’t need to go all-in for your first match, and may be able to borrow some of it in any case. First off, you’ll need the most important part: your costume!  If you’ve ever been to or seen video of a SASS match, you know how elaborate shooters’ outfits can get.  In fact, costume contests are a part of many of the larger matches. Fortunately, the rules don’t require costumes to be quite so fancy, and you won’t need as much when just getting started.  Plain blue jeans, some sort of long-sleeve button-front shirt in plaid or denim, a leather boot (preferably cowboy-style, but a simple work boot will do), and a cowboy-type hat will do. Oh! And the guns.  You’ll need guns too, since this is a shooting match.  The general rule for CAS firearms is that they must be of a design that is from the late 19th century.  Replicas and reproductions are allowed, so you won’t need to go antique-shopping or shoot an heirloom firearm to participate. For pistols, you’ll need not one, but two, single-action revolvers .  There are a number of great cowboy action revolvers out there….one common choice is the Ruger Vaquero ($649.00). Ruger Vaqueros Though you’ll of course not want to discount the classic Colt Single Action Army ($1,649.00) . Colt "Single Action Army" Why do you need two?  Because instead of reloading pistols while shooting a stage, you’ll just holster the first one when you’re done with it, and draw the second pistol when you need to shoot more. You’ll also need a lever action rifle in a pistol caliber .  The most common is an 1873 model, from one of several makers, like this one from Cimarron called the Texas Brush Popper ($1,300). Cimarron "Texas Brush Popper" Another common choice is the Winchester Model 1892 ($1,100) . "Winchester Model 1892" ED: If you’re looking for a more budget-minded rifle, the Marlin 1895 Cowboy ($560.00) is an excellent choice. And finally, you’ll need a pump or double-barrel shotgun from the right era .  For pump guns, most found in CAS are based on the Winchester Model 1897, like this one from IAC Imports , if they aren’t originals. IAC Model 1897 But of course, part of the fun of CAS is getting to buy really fun guns and competing in it is the perfect excuse to finally buy that side-by-side double-barrel shotgun.  Like a Stoeger Coach Gun , perhaps? Stoeger Coach Gun Supreme You know, because reasons.  After all, CAS is very much about the fun, and there’s not much more fun than a coach gun! In addition to the costume and the guns, you will need a few other things early in your CAS career. As in other action shooting sports, you’ll need some way to hold your pistols – a holster for each of them.  Most leather holsters are fine as long as you keep in mind the spirit of costuming for the Old West and as long as they are rigid enough for you to quickly and safely reholster your guns. You can buy them from a variety of local makers or go to one of the national companies like De Santis or El Paso Saddlery , who makes this lovely set here. El Paso Speed Rig There are various options on how you can set them up, whether both on your strong side, one on each side of your body, or one strong side and one set up as a cross draw.  You’ll just want to be careful to make sure that drawing the gun doesn’t lead to you breaking any safety rules. Your holsters should be attached to a leather belt that is sturdy enough to hold your guns.  You might want one that also has loops for extra ammunition, but that’s not strictly necessary.  It’ll look something like this DeSantis Desperado belt ($88.56) DeSantis Desperado Gun Belt If your belt doesn’t have a way to hold shotgun shells, you can put them in your pockets for your first match.  Eventually, you’ll need either a separate shotgun belt or a shell carrier .  Shell carriers are also known as “slides” because they slide or snap on over your gun belt, like this one from Triple K below. Triple K Shot Shell Carrier And finally, you’ll want some way of hauling all of your gear around the range.  Like modern 3-gun, wheeled carts are very common.  Unlike modern 3-gun, CAS carts can get a little elaborate .  The important part is that they can carry your rifle and shotgun upright and with the actions visibly open.  You don’t have to buy a specialty one, and might even be able to make your own like this person did . Marauder Gun Cart And don’t feel like you need one to show up at your first match.  If you’re new, someone will share with you – it’s just another part of the welcoming atmosphere at a SASS match! Picking a Cowboy Action Category SASS is unique in that the guns are generally similar for everyone.  Shooters are divided up into categories by gender, age, and shooting style instead, outside of the folks who choose to shoot black powder or cap and ball firearms. Most competitors will compete in the Cowboy/Cowgirl categories, which cover nearly all adults.  Older shooters can choose to enter categories available only to those over a certain age, or they can compete in Cowboy/Cowgirl instead. As for shooting style, most people will shoot with each pistol held in both hands….but this is cowboy shooting!  You can also choose to shoot with just one hand, called Duelist, one-handed with both hands (Double Duelist), or Gunfighter, which is shooting with one pistol in each hand at the same time and alternating between the two. Are you confused yet?  That’s okay.  Most local matches where you’ll start out have only a handful of categories.  Just show up with your gear and someone will help you figure out where you belong.  There’s somewhere for everyone to belong, regardless of age or gender, whether you’re there to enjoy shooting the guns or wearing the costumes.  That’s one of the best things about the sport. Learn the CAS Rules While you don’t need to be an expert shooter to play in CAS, you do need to have some basic skills before you show up to your first match. Most importantly, you will need to know how to operate each of the guns that you’ll be using.  While some of us grew up shooting single-action revolvers, lever action rifles, and pump or side-by-side shotguns, those of us who are newer to firearms may not know as much about them. Either way, some dry fire practice will help you get familiar with your CAS guns, especially with thumbing the hammer on your revolvers, working the lever on your rifle, and loading your shotgun. Under some of the SASS divisions, which we’ll talk about later, you might also need to shoot your revolvers with both hands.  Otherwise, you’ll need to be able to draw both of your revolvers and get them into your primary shooting hand.  That takes some practice as well. Knowing how to shoot each individual gun isn’t enough for CAS, since you’ll have to shoot all of them in any single stage.  That’s why knowing how to transition between the guns is also important. As a first-time shooter, the most difficult skill will be safely drawing and reholstering your pistols on the clock.  Doing it under pressure, with a timer running and people watching, can make it easy to make mistakes like leaving your finger in the trigger when reholstering.  To avoid that, remember that you don’t have to be fast, just safe. Your long guns, rifle and shotgun, will be staged on tables, so you will only need to pick them up and put them down when you are done with them.  However, while your rifle will be preloaded, you will need to be able to load your shotgun on the clock. Range Rules at Cowboy Action Matches The usual gun safety rules always apply, and the SASS rules build on them in the safe direction area in particular.  They use something called a “ 170 rule .”  Much like the “180 rule” in other shooting sports, the 170 rule controls how far a muzzle may deviate from pointing straight downrange. With the 170 rule, your gun must stay pointed within a cone centered on the line between the shooter when facing the back berm of the range and extending 85 degrees on each side from that line. SASS also is very particular about the loaded and unloaded condition of your firearms.  You may only load when you are told to, and only at what is called a loading table.  There’s one at every stage, and there will be someone there to supervise you when you go through that process. CAS Loading Table After you are done loading, you must make sure that the hammers on your pistols and rifle are down on empty chambers only.  That means that your six-shot revolver will only be loaded with five rounds, to allow the hammer to go down on an empty chamber.  Your shotgun will remain unloaded until after you start the stage. While you are shooting, you are never allowed to move with a loaded gun where the hammer has been cocked so that it is ready to shoot.  You also need to make sure that when you reholster one of your revolvers, the hammer must be down on either a spent case or an empty chamber, like this: Colt SAA with Hammer on Empty Chambe Are you starting to see why a little bit of knowledge and experience in running your guns is important for this shooting sport?  It can be challenging to keep track of all of the rules about what condition your gun is in if you aren’t familiar with its operation. Fortunately, the rules for the shooting part itself are much simpler. After you have prepared your guns at the loading table, you’ll hang out there until it’s your turn to shoot.  After you’re called up, you’ll stage your rifle and shotgun as directed, then get ready to go. Range commands in CAS are similar to what you’ll find in other shooting sports: “Shooter ready?”  “Stand by…”  and then the mind-erasing beep. While you’re shooting, three spotters will watch to make sure you’ve hit all of the targets in the correct order.  When you’re done, the timer operator will check with them to see if there were any issues.  If not, they’ll hold up a fist to indicate that you shot a clean stage. If the spotters disagree, the benefit of the doubt will always go to the shooter. After that, you’ll go to the unloading table to unload all of your guns, again under supervision to make sure that your guns are completely empty and clear of any ammunition. Confused?  Make sure you tell your posse marshal, the person who runs your squad – sorry, posse in CAS parlance – that you’re new, and he or she will help you out along with all of the other experienced shooters in your posse. Winning "Cowboy Action Matches" While CAS is a shooting competition, it’s very much focused on the fun.  Even at bigger championship matches, prizes are usually trophies and bragging rights, so while they are winners, coming out on top is only part of what drives a CAS competitor. The 2017 National Champions, SASS Kicker and Deuce Stevens, were just awarded these fancy belt buckles. (Photo courtesy of Single Action Shooting Society) It helps that the shooting itself isn’t particularly difficult, so it’s accessible to all levels of shooters.  The main difference between new and experienced shooters is how fast they transition between guns and shoot the targets.  Regardless of speed, the key is actually hitting all of the targets, in the prescribed order, called shooting “clean.” If you miss any of the targets, or shoot them out of order, then you will receive a penalty in the form of time added to how long it took you to shoot the stage.  Misses, when you don’t hit the target with the right firearm or at all, add five seconds. Shooting targets in the wrong order or committing minor safety violations will earn you an extra ten seconds per stage.  Major safety violations will disqualify you from that stage or possibly the entire match. Once all of the times and penalties are totaled up, then there are two ways a match winner can be determined: lowest time for the entire match, or “rank scoring.”  Rank scoring is when each shooter receives the number of points equal to his or her placement on a stage – fastest time gets one point, second place gets two, and so on.  Lowest total number of points across the match wins. All of the targets are reactive in some way, usually some form of steel in themed shapes that can be heard or is knocked over when hit.  Clay birds may also be used, both stationary and flying. Targets are normally placed very close to the shooter – usually between 12 and 20 yards for rifle, and around 7 yards for pistol.  These are extremely close distances for steel targets, so safety is maintained by carefully angling targets down to encourage any ricochets or splashes to bounce towards the ground and controlling the ammunition used. All ammunition must be either lead or polymer-coated in any color but gold.  That’s because no jacketed, plated, or copper-washed bullets are allowed due to the potential for fragments to come back towards the shooter and others.  Fortunately, there are commercial loads available like this Black Hills .357 Magnum ammunition , so you aren’t required to reload to shoot CAS. Black Hills Cowboy Ammo In addition, ammunition is generally loaded to a very low velocity for CAS.  Unlike almost every other shooting sport, SASS doesn’t just have a minimum power factor , it also has a maximum power factor.  Slower moving bullets don’t just recoil less, they tend to ricochet less off steel. By the way, you won’t need very much of that ammunition.  SASS stages are normally just 10 pistol rounds, 10 rifle rounds, and 4-6 shotgun shells.  It’s another way of keeping the sport accessible, both in terms of stage complexity and ammo affordability.  Just make sure you bring extra to every match, just in case! Saddle Up! And that’s everything you need to know to get started…and then some! Just remember that Cowboy Action Shooting is very much about the fun, so get into the spirit of the game, pick out an alias, find a costume, and go have a blast! Are you interested in Cowboy Action Shooting?  Is there some other competition you want to know about?  Let us know in the comments!

Different Ammo in the Same GunKaboom?

Different Ammo in the Same GunKaboom?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Your revolver is a .357 magnum, but people say it shoots .38 special. Your new AR-15 says it can shoot 5.56x45mm NATO, but your friends say just pick up a box of .223. What’s going on here? Has the world turned upside down?  Don’t they realize that we’re dealing with BULLETS here? Have a cup of tea. Let’s talk. It’s possible that a firearm chambered for one round can safely fire another.  There could be any number of reasons for this.  Some guns, like the Taurus Judge, are designed to do that, and with some, it’s just a happy coincidence. Common Examples The best example of this is the .357 magnum revolver.  You see, back in the long-long-ago, the 1930s, police officers were issued .38 special revolvers as their sidearms.  About this time, bullet-proof vests were just coming into being and gangsters were using their car doors as cover during shoot-outs. Speed Loader for 5-shot .38 on left; Tuff Strip for .357 Mag on right Well, .38 special couldn’t pierce body armor and it wouldn’t go through car doors, so police departments looked for a solution.  Smith & Wesson provided one in a new round that used a standard .38 special bullet but with a lot more power behind it.  It was dubbed the .357 magnum. Editor's Choice Smith & Wesson Model 686+ 729 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 729 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The bullets have the same diameter, but the .357 could punch through the new body armor that was showing up on the streets. As mentioned, the .357 magnum has a lot more power, which means more pressure.  Regular .38 special revolvers couldn’t handle the pressure, which meant that .357 magnum revolvers made specifically to handle the load had to be developed. As an added safety precaution the length of the .357 magnum case was extended by 1/8 of an inch.  This way, a person couldn’t load and close a .38 special revolver with .357 magnum ammunition and accidentally blow themselves up. But because the diameter of both bullets are the same and the pressure in a .38 special is less than that of a .357 magnum, a .38 special round can be safely fired in a .357 magnum revolver or lever gun. So to sum up in one sentence: You can shoot .38 special in .357 magnum guns, but you can’t shoot .357 magnum in .38 special guns.  Got it? If you want to learn more and get some great ammo recommendations, read our Best .38 Spl & .357 Mag Ammo article. Under Pressure Pressure is the big determining factor because a firearm rated for one kind of ammunition may have features beyond safety designed specifically for that round. For instance, according to Patrick Sweeney at Rifle Shooter Magazine , the 5.56x45mm and the .223 look the same, but the 5.56 is loaded for a higher pressure to increase velocity. Chambers that are designed specifically for .223 have a narrower leade (the unrifled portion of the chamber ahead of the rifling) and a steeper angle of rifling.  This is because the .223 was designed primarily for accuracy. The 5.56 was designed to deliver more power and reliability, so the leade is wider and longer to allow more build-up of crud and a more gentle angle of rifling to accommodate the power of the 5.56. Common Bullet Sizes Sweeney said the end result is that you can safely fire a .223 in a 5.56 chamber, but there are risks when firing a 5.56 in a .223 chamber.  He also recommends that even if your AR15 says 5.56 and .223, you should check it for yourself with a leade/throat gauge. Some manufacturers use .223 barrels because they’re more accurate but they stamp their rifles as 5.56 and .223. Personally, I’ve never seen/heard of this happening nor have I have ever double-checked a barrel that came from a respectable manufacturer. What about .308 and 7.62x51mm? There’s a similar issue between .308 Winchester and 7.62X51mm.  The .308 is a hotter load and the headspace is different from that of the 7.62.  So while they look identical and people will say you can use them interchangeably, they’re different rounds. Generally speaking, you can safely shoot 7.62mm in a .308 rifle, but you’re taking a risk going in the other direction. These three examples aren’t the only ones out there. Like with the .357 magnum example above, you can shoot .44 Special (I bet you didn’t even know there was a .44 Special, huh?  Learn something new every day) in a .44 Magnum, but not the other way around. Taurus straight up advertises that you can shoot a .45 Long Colt or a .410 shotgun shell in their Taurus Judge.  It’s just a matter of knowing what you can fire from your weapon safely. Old M1895 Nagant revolvers can supposedly shoot .32S&W, .32S&W Long and .32H&R Magnum rounds, but it’s not safe, and I’m telling you right now you shouldn’t do it. Mosin Nagant revovler…widely thought to be the worst revolver ever adopted by a military force Like a lot of things with firearms, it all comes down to safety.  When in doubt, use the ammunition that’s stamped on the firearm.  But it’s nice to know that there are other options out there. Want to learn more about calibers and bullet types?  Check out our Common Calibers Guide . Know of some other firearms that can shoot two different cartridges? Tell us about them in the comments! Any other questions…we cover almost everything in our Beginner’s Guide to Guns .

Smith & Wessons Most Famous Top-Break: The Schofield

Smith & Wessons Most Famous Top-Break: The Schofield

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f37949422835_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f37949422835_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Smith & Wesson's Schofield has captured firearms enthusiasts' imaginations since its inception and has played an impressive role in American history. The Smith &; Wesson Schofield (usually pronounced SKO-field rather than SHOW-field) revolver is probably the best known by the general public of any of the Model Threes, and the one most associated with the Old West in the collective American imagination. Such is its popularity that some gun enthusiasts who are not familiar with the older S&W’s will tend to call any large frame S&W top-break a “Schofield.” It has received some exposure in movie and TV westerns, most notably and recently in Clint Eastwood's “Unforgiven,” but also in earlier efforts such as “Nevada Smith,” “Trackdown,” and “Alias Smith & Jones.” The Schofield originated with the efforts of Col. George Schofield to improve the American Model Three for military usage. The American was the first cartridge revolver adopted by the military in 1870, with a purchase of 1,000. However, in 1874 the Army purchased 8,000 Colt Single Action Army models, noting a preference for their strength and simplicity. In Army tests of this era, S&W Americans and Russians passed the firing and functioning criteria, but were criticized for their complexity and number of parts. The greater ease and speed of reloading was noted, but was not given much credence as a tactical advantage. The Russian model was criticized for the awkwardness of its grip, hammer, and trigger-guard spur. As early as 1871, Schofield had been working on improvements to the S&W American that he felt would render it more suitable for military usage. The most obvious of these consisted of changing the latch from barrel mounted to frame mounted. The Schofield model was tested and met with military approval. They requested that it be produced for the .45 Colt cartridge. S&W demurred, noting that the rim of the .45 Colt was inadequate for positive extraction in the S&W design, and no doubt considering that the cylinder and frame of the Model 3 would have to be lengthened to accommodate the long round. Instead, S&W offered to redesign the military cartridge to a .45-caliber round that would function in both types of revolvers. This was found acceptable, and 3,000 S&W Schofield’s were initially ordered in 1875. Further minor modifications were made, and an additional 5,000 in the Second Model configuration were delivered in 1877. By the end of 1877, the Army had purchased around 8,000 S&W Schofield’s, and around 15,000 Colt SAAs. A few guns were made for the civilian market, but the vast majority of Schofields were military guns. Military Usage Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Many Schofields were issued to active units, reportedly including the 4th, 9th, and 10th Cavalry. The 4th was involved in the Geronimo campaign. The 9th and 10th comprised the famous “Buffalo Soldiers” – African American troops stationed in the American Southwest. There they fought in the Indian Wars, including campaigns against the Apaches, and served in civil disturbances such as the Lincoln County War. Related GunDigest Articles New Rifle: Smith & Wesson's Economical M&P10 Sport Review: Smith & Wesson M&P M2.0 Classic Guns: "The Smith &" ; Wesson .357 Magnum Revolver Other Schofields went to state militias. New York received 2,000 in 1877; Michigan 536 in 1878 and 1879; Indiana 300 in 1878 and 1879; Territory of Washington 180 in 1882 and 1891; California at least 100 and possibly 300 in 1880; Kansas 100 in 1879; West Virginia 79 in 1878; with lesser quantities going to Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, and Tennessee. Florida, Maine, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania received fewer than seven guns each. It’s probable that some of the guns sold to state militias had been previously issued to regular army units. A Schofield believed to have been used at the Battle of the Little Big Horn is owned by the Smithsonian Institution, although it has never been clear which side its owner was fighting on. After the annihilation of Custer and his men, there was some argument in print that the outcome might have been different had the troops been armed with Winchester repeaters and the fast loading Schofields instead of single shot Trap doors and slow-reloading Peacemakers. Col. Charles Pate, noted authority on S&W military revolvers, writes that the big S&W was still in use by regular army units as of 1887. Several Pate articles on Schofields will be found in the 25th Anniversary reprints of the SWCA Journal. Springfield Research Service reports that some Schofields were apparently still in service with volunteer units in 1898 during the Spanish American War. However, many had been retired earlier. The Old West Many of the surplus Schofields were purchased by dealers such as Bannerman and Schuyler, Hartley & Graham. They were then offered for sale, often with the barrel cut to a handier 5-inch length and the gun nickel plated to withstand the rigors of Western usage. The combination of quick reload-ability and big .45-caliber power made them popular with lawmen, outlaws, and others who were serious about their sidearms. Schofields were reportedly favorites of the James Gang, with serial numbers 3444 and 5476 attributed to Frank James and serial number 2341 to Cole Younger. Jesse James carried serial number 366, and serial number 273 is reported to have been used by a James Gang member, possibly Jesse. Famous lawman Bill Tilghman and Frank McLowery of O.K. Corral fame are among others who are reported to have carried Schofields.

USCCA Review [2020]: Why I Chose It & Comparison

USCCA Review [2020]: Why I Chose It & Comparison

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Wow, there’s a lot of CCW insurance providers now. And like you…I wanted to make sure I had the best . I feel it’s one of those things that if you really need it…you want to make sure you have the best. USCCA Membership Well…I guess there’s my seal of approval (since 2017)! Read on to learn more about why I chose USCCA and how they compare to other insurance companies such as NRA’s Carry Guard (now defunct, more info down below). August 2019 Update: Still a paying member!  And USCCA reached out to me to offer you guys Pew Pew Tactical’s online beginner pistol course for free ($67 value).  Details at the bottom. November 2019 Update : I also now cover the three states where USCCA is not currently active (NY, NJ, & WA). Now I’m an Elite member (with a real photographer): USCCA Elite Membership Table of Contents Loading... What Exactly is Concealed Carry & Self Defense Insurance I only became aware of the entire concept of concealed carry insurance earlier this year after USCCA gave out free t-shirts at SHOT show.  I would have forgotten…but their emails do not let you forget. So Many Emails But hey…super effective since I ended up buying the insurance and writing this article! So what exactly is this kind of insurance? Basically…if you defend yourself with a gun (or other weapon), you’re going to be in a big mess …even if it was justified. Insurance comes in to help with bail, civil/criminal defense, lost wages, etc. Chances are you’ll never have to use it. But if you’re carrying…there’s that slight possibility.  And we’ve all seen what happens to people who go on trial for self-defense ( It’s Not the Odds, It’s the Cost ). And it’s not a pretty sight. At least now you might not have to go into bankruptcy and wreck your family. Pricing Next thought I had was…ok, so there’s that slight possibility of a world of hurt…how much does it cost to alleviate it and protect my loved ones? *Update October 2017 : They have updated their protection levels to Gold, Platinum, and Elite. USCCA has 3 tiers of protection: Gold (Up to $600,000 in protection) at $22/month Platinum (Up to $1,150,000 in protection) at $30/month Elite (Up to $2,225,000 in protection) at $47/month Not bad…at least at the lowest tier.  That’s like two boxes of 9mm a month. Next up, let’s see what you really get. What You Get in USCCA’s Self Defense Shield I’m not some insurance pro, and if you’re in the market for this stuff always do your own research and read the actual fine print for whatever insurance product you end up getting. Let’s walk through each of these using the Platinum plan (since it’s closest to the NRA plan): USCCA Plans, as of 10/17/2017 $1,000,000 in Civil Suit Defense, Civil Suit Damages, Firearm Theft What they’ll pay up to in civil cases $150,000 in Criminal Defense Protection Up-front payment (important) for attorney’s retainer $25,000 / $250,000 Bail Bonding The asterisk says “ Reflects 10% of the face amount of the bond.  For example, $25,000 reflects a $250,000 bond. “ It’s my understanding you’ll only get 10% of the bond (whatever it is), and only up to $25,000 which would mean a $250,000+ bond. Hardship, Psychology Support, & Compensation Costs to help with what happens due to the incident and court proceedings Let me know if I goofed anywhere too! Cunningham’s Law Still with me? USCCA "Self Defense Shield" vs NRA Carry Guard "August 2019 Update" : NRA Carry Guard is now shutdown due to several investigations and lawsuits.  I’m leaving this as legacy since it still covers tons of the pros, but otherwise you can scroll down to where we compare USCCA vs others still running. It’s insurance right? So I definitely compared the rates and coverage vs some other guys.  In this case I went with the 2nd biggest (or at least 2nd best marketed) player…the NRA’s Carry Guard . I always knew NRA had some insurance program…that wasn’t the greatest according to almost everyone. But its new Carry Guard made a big splash…but not for being revolutionary.  But for how NRA dis-invited USCCA from its 2017 Annual Meeting where they announced their new insurance. NRA Kickout, TheFirearmBlog Not the classiest thing…but I can understand the business behind it. How do the two compare ( USCCA Platinum vs the now-defunct NRA Gold)? USCCA vs NRA Comparison, Updated July 2017 Let’s break down the big points in my opinion: Price : $30/month or $347/year (USCCA) vs $31.95/month or $359/year (NRA) First thing that bothers me is that you save peanuts when you go for a year…so I signed up for monthly myself.  Second, they are roughly the same for all their different levels.  Slight Edge to USCCA. How Much Protection : $1,150,000 (USCCA) vs $1,000,000 (NRA) Pretty close too for their respective tiers.  Looks like USCCA’s $1,000,000 civil is added plus its criminal while NRA’s is lumped together.  Edge to USCCA. Criminal Defense Payout Method : 100% up front (USCCA) vs 20% up front and 80% if not guilty (NRA) This is a BIGGIE ! You’ll get 150K up front from USCCA for criminal defense while only 20% of $150K from NRA which only equals $30K.  Anything else you’ll have to pony up yourself.  And you won’t get anything else if you’re found guilty!  I’m all for punishing the actually guilty but that sucks…especially when USCCA doesn’t have that caveat. Big Edge to USCCA. Types of Weapons Covered : Legal weapons (USCCA) vs firearm only (NRA) Another big one…USCCA will cover legal weapons such as knives, fists, bats, etc. while NRA is only your firearm.  I don’t carry my gun much but will carry other things, so this one was as big factor. Edge to USCCA Spousal Coverage : Yes for both, but USCCA is only inside the home. For a while there was some discussion on whether it applied for NRA but now it seems it is indeed covered. For USCCA you can add on your same coverage for your spouse for as low as $77/year based on your plan.  That means everywhere in the US. Previous edge to NRA since it has protection for your spouse outside of the home.  But now goes to USCCA because of the awesome bargain to add on your spouse for your same coverage. Mr. and Mrs. Smith Attorney Network : All over 50 states (USCCA) vs no (NRA) I’m mixed over this one since on one hand I’d like to know that there’s firearms attorneys ready to help…but I’m also afraid they might not be the best.  I like the option of having both. Edge to USCCA. Training : Yes to both. I didn’t really research that much into this…but it looks like USCCA has some videos while NRA has it coming soon .  However, it does seem like NRA has in-person classes…but having their insurance might not be a prerequisite and you have to pay. Remains to be seen…but edge to USCCA for having it up already. Again, let me know if things have changed…yet again. USCCA vs Others Other Insurance Providers I know a bunch of you are thinking right now…but I’ve got [ other kind of CCW protection ], how does it compare?!? I tried going down the rabbit hole but got really lost.  I’ll leave it to you to research more. Here’s some of the ones I’ve found. CCW Safe : Technically not insurance but provides protection in the form of covering your legal defense with their team. Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network : A membership program where you pay into a fund that will pay your legal expenses. Second Call Defense : Pretty similar numbers but the up-front attorney retainer is lower (max is $10k). Texas Law Shield : They have a network of their own attorneys across TX and some other states…but aren’t everywhere.  And they found themselves in some hot water with a class action suit . Do your homework! *Update* My lawyer buddy helped me go through a couple of the other guys in a Concealed Carry Insurance Comparison article. But here’s my thoughts on why I chose USCCA. Why I Eventually Chose USCCA It was the most well-known to me.  And the whole NRA thing had me rooting for the underdog. Pretty much same price as NRA but with slightly more in overall protection. Up front criminal defense protection instead of less up front and the rest only when you’re acquitted. Ability to be covered with all legal weapons. Covered my wife at home which is all she needs.  She doesn’t carry out of the house…but the ability to add her on for $77/year is a great perk. Attorney network + ability to choose my own.  Some of the other ones you’re forced to use their network. Some Negatives I’m very glad to not have actually used the insurance.  But off the bat there’s a flurry of emails.  So be ready for that…but it’s something that’s easily remedied with an unsubscribe. Also, the tone of the videos and ads that now I’m bombarded on other sites (thanks retargeting) is always a scare tactic. I get it! USCCA Disallowed States 2019 has been a turbulent year with several states trying to stop self-protection insurance companies.  Here’s some of the official wording from USCCA regarding them. New York “Unfortunately, due to circumstances beyond our control the USCCA is currently unable to sell memberships in the State of New York. We are actively searching for a membership option that will be acceptable in NY.” New Jersey “On Sept 10, the governor of New Jersey, Phil Murphy, signed an executive order directing New Jersey’s Department of Banking and Insurance to prohibit or limit the sale of insurance products that encourage the improper use of firearms.” USCCA is still working through the system since they technically aren’t insurance and I’m not sure how its product is encouring the “improper use of firearms.”  I’ll update if I get more news but right now new subscriptions and renews are suspended. Washington “The USCCA has reached a resolution with State of Washington Insurance Commissioner’s Office.  The USCCA is currently not selling any new USCCA memberships in Washington.  The USCCA is diligently working on a membership delivery structure that is acceptable to the "Washington Insurance Commissioner’s" Office.  The USCCA is hopeful that in the very near future we will be able to present the Washington Insurance Commissioner’s Office with a membership delivery model that will be acceptable so that citizens of the State of Washington can enjoy the many benefits of USCCA membership.” Conclusion I ended up with the cheapest Silver monthly plan from USCCA (now a legacy plan).  Check out all of them here . And that’s because I know there’s the very small chance of me needing it, and I don’t carry most of the time anyways.  But I do like how it covers both my wife and me in the house.  And if she ever decides to carry out outside…it’s only $77/year (for the Gold). What’s your take on CCW insurance…do you have USCCA or another one? Special USCCA Offer If you use my link to sign up, USCCA will cover your tuition for our $67 Gun Noob Beginner Pistol Course .  And that’s ANY plan…even if you go monthly. Now you’ll have piece of mind and a great refresher (or intro) course on safe pistol handling.  You’ll get an email with a special code 2-3 weeks after joining the USCCA family.

The 4 Best J Frame Holsters – Reviews 2020 Photo by Davidwhitewolf / CC BY The J frame is a frame size regarding Smith and Wesson’s smallest revolver size. While Smith and Wesson developed the term J frame, these days it is used to acknowledge a particular class of small, compact, revolver. With an explosion in concealed carry popularity the J frame is an obvious choice for the revolver aficionado. Choosing the right holster however can be daunting. The most important function for any holster is to be both secure, and facilitate a fast draw. Since a variety of companies produce J frames they all deviated a bit here or there in size. It’s important to find a holster that is adaptable and flexible to accommodate a J frame made by S&W, Ruger, Taurus, or even an old school Colt. The vast majority of revolvers are steel and need some support to remain comfortable. The best J frame holsters will be strong enough keep the weapon in its proper position but comfortable enough for all day wear for the user. Uncle Mike’s Inside the Pocket holster Uncle Mike's Off-Duty and Concealment Nylon OT Inside-The-Pocket Holster (Size 3, Black) Price: $9.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:39 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Uncle Mike produces a wide variety of gun holsters and has been for decades. They had a reputation for producing budget friendly holsters that are simple, but are also high quality and durable. The Uncle Mike’s Pocket holster is no different. The Inside the Pocket Holster is a popular choice for J frames and pocket carry is often the easiest method of concealed carry for a variety of people. You can pocket carry in nearly any style of clothes and a cover garment is not needed. "The Uncle Mike’s" Pocket Holster is a very lightweight holster made for numerous small firearms, and they fit the J frame well. The Uncle Mike’s holster is made from very soft material to guarantee comfort. When you are carrying a gun in your pocket you need a comfortable holster to prevent chaffing, and protect you from all the sharp corners and pokes and prods a gun has. The holster features a stretch of material that encircles the entire holster. This grippy material is designed to keep the holster in your pocket when you draw your firearm. It seems hokey, but it works wonders. The holster stays in the pocket even with the rapidest of draws. Even in looser fitting slacks the holster really grips inside the pocket. The Uncle Mike’s Pocket Holster is simple in design, durable in nature, and is a practical way to carry a firearm. This is undoubtedly one of the best J frame holsters on the market. Fobus Paddle Holster Concealed Carry "Fobus Paddle Holster" S&W J Frame .38, .357 cal Revolver HandGun & Pistol Pouch Price: $23.03 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:39 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The Fobus is made primarily of Kydex, and Kydex is the newest generation of holster making material. Kydex is primarily a polymer material designed to be molded to specific firearms and is known to be both flexible and durable in its construction. The Fobus Paddle Holsters are outside the waistband holsters that utilize a paddle to ride on the hip. This negates the use of a belt, although a belt will help to keep the weapon secure. The holsters are custom molded for a J frame and used a passive retention device. Passive retention means the operator does not have to disable a device to draw the weapon. The weapon stays in the holster securely but does not have a button, strap, or any other form of locking device. The retention relies mostly upon tension to secure the weapon. The paddle is very comfortable and conforms to the body well. The paddle itself is made from a thin layer of Kydex that allows it to flex and bend to conform. The holster is a bit stiffer and holsters the weapon high and strong. Drawing from a holster that features passive retention, and rides outside the waist is probably one of the fastest methods of getting a gun on target. The Fobus holster is also affordably priced and is a very comfortable holster for all day carry. It’s hard to beat the Fobus Paddle Holster as an outside the waist option. Blackhawk Inside the Pants Holster BLACKHAWK Inside-the-Pants Holster, Size 03, Left Hand, (4 1/2 - 5" Large Autos) Price: $17.62 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:39 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. When it comes to maximizing concealment and draw speed there is no better compromise than an inside the pants holster. These holsters go between the body and the pants, and the weapon is held secured by an out facing clip or clips depending on the model. The Blackhawk is a nylon holster that is capable of holding a small revolver, like our buddy the J frame. The Blackhawk inside the pants holster is an open top design and does not have a retention device. The tension is generated between your body, your gun, and you pants. This holds the weapon in place and is often more than sufficient. Since the weapon is hardly exposed it is near impossible for someone else to grab your weapon. These holsters are often one of the best choices when it comes to concealment. The Blackhawk holster can be worn with shorts, flip-flops, and a t-shirt. Inside the Waistband, aka IWB holsters like the Blackhawk is an excellent option for concealed carry in hot weather. The holster is made from a soft and comfortable material, which is comfortable when it’s rubbing directly on your skin all day. The Blackhawk Inside the Pants holster is among the best J frame holster options for total concealment and is lightweight, comfortable for all day carry. Uncle Mike’s Law Enforcement Ankle Holster Uncle Mike's Off-Duty and Concealment Kodra Nylon Ankle Holster (Black, Size 10, Left Hand) Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 03:39 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Ankle holsters can be a source of contention among gun enthusiasts. Some argue they are difficult to draw from, and way too far away from the hand. Others argue the ankle holster is easy to draw when seated, and can be worn in typical office wear with ease. If you decide you’d like an ankle holster it is important to know how to choose a quality model. The Uncle Mike’s L.E. ankle holster is designed to be high quality, comfortable, and capable. Capable of carrying your weapon all day, without the risk of it sliding up and down, shifting, or becoming a boat anchor on your ankle. The Uncle Mike’s L.E. holster comes with an anchor system that attaches above your holster to hold to the weapon in place. Instead of a single band supporting the weapon, you get two for increased support. The Uncle Mike’s L.E. ankle holster is capable of holding a variety of small handguns, J frame included. The Uncle Mike’s interior bands are backed up with a soft interior material that prevents being rubbed raw. The holster utilizes a thumb snap retention device to keep the weapon stable. This thumb snap is adjustable and can be moved to a variety of different positions to better fit the weapon. The Uncle Mike’s L.E. holster is probably the best J frame holster for ankle carry if one went that route. The holster remains comfortable, is easy to draw from in the right position, and is capable of supporting both an air weight J-frame, and a standard model without any stress regardless of weight. Parting Shot This is only 4 of many, many holsters out there. These four do meet the necessary requirements to be a good holster. They are adaptable to a variety of different companies J frames, they are strong, secure, comfortable, and aid in all day carry and a swift draw. They are also quite affordable, and represent an excellent value for the modern concealed carrier. Boyd Smith Owner of Reloaderaddict.com, Boyd Smith is a major handgun enthusiast, and although he owns Glocks, he prefers the revolving wheel type.  His go-to guns are a Smith & Wesson 642 Performance Center for carry and a Ruger GP100 in the nightstand biometric safe (he has kids).  He loads both revolvers with old-school 148-grain Federal Gold Medal .38 wadcutters.  It’s OK if you think he’s a wimp. Email him . Share the Post and Images Related Posts The 4 Best Paddle Holsters "– Reviews 2020" The 4 Best OWB 1911 Holsters – Reviews 2020 The 4 Most Comfortable Shoulder Holsters – Reviews 2020

Hearing Protection Act [2019 Status Update]: Is It Dead?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s You hear that? Of course you don’t, because that’s the sound of a gun with a silencer on it and silencers make guns completely silent!  They’re super dangerous and should never be in the hands of gun-owners, especially criminals. Back in the land of reality, however, silencers, also known as suppressors, are actually useful in reducing the noise level of gunshots and helping to preserve the hearing of hunters and gun-enthusiasts everywhere. Be vewy vewy quiet Luckily for us, some effort has begun in recent years to make suppressors more accessible to the general public, though we’re still a ways off from the days of walking into your local gun store and buying a silencer off the shelf. First Things First While “silencers” and suppressors” refer to the same thing in the eyes of the law (specifically our buddies at the ATF), it’s important to point out that silencers are anything but silent.  If your only interaction with silencers is what you’ve seen in movies, then you probably think they make gunshots sound like little laser blasters. Pew pew pew pew pew! If that were true, then silencers would be amazing! Amazingly dangerous, but also amazingly awesome! Unfortunately, silencers, which we’re going to refer to as “suppressors” from now on to avoid any confusion, can’t reduce or eliminate the noise of a gunshot to anywhere near the level portrayed in movies. In fact, the guy who invented the suppressor also invented the car muffler at the same time, because both items effectively do the same thing.  A suppressor traps the expanding gas that comes blasting out of the barrel of your firearm (that pushes the bullet along with it), and the extra space allows the gas to dissipate at a slower rate and cool down in the process. By the time the slower and cooler gas exits the chambers of the suppressor, there is less pressure difference between the gas and the outside air, and the “pop” of the firearm is reduced. The gas exiting the barrel of a gun passes through a suppressor and comes out slower and cooler, reducing the noise of the gunshot For anyone who is lucky enough to have experienced shooting a firearm with a suppressor attached, you know that the gunshot was definitely quieter. Quieter, but not silent. A typical gunshot from a firearm, whether coming from a 9mm round from a handgun like the trusty Glock 17, or from a 5.56mm round from your favorite AR-15, will produce about 160dB of noise.  By comparison, a jackhammer is about 110dB and an ambulance siren is about 120dB. With a suppressor attached, a gunshot will typically be reduced to about 120dB.  At ambulance-siren level noise, not even James Bond would be able to take out patrolling bad guys without alerting the entire evil lair. What is important, aside from how cool any gun looks with a suppressor attached, is that the gunshot is noticeably quieter, about equivalent to you wearing earplugs vs none at all.  For those of us who spend a lot of time around firearms, either while hunting, or just spending time shooting at targets downrange, anything we can do to reduce the amount of noise from a gunshot goes a long way. So What’s the Big Deal? Of course, when you make the argument that suppressors are to help with our hearing, many people, especially those with no experience with actual suppressors (or even firearms), think you’re just trying to get your hands on suppressors to make your guns into silent killing machines. Obviously, law-abiding gun-owners, who have already gone through background checks to purchase firearms in the first place, will immediately turn to a life of crime and go on a killing spree if they are given the opportunity to purchase a suppressor. It’s that type of thinking that initially led to suppressors being put in as part of the National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA).  Even back in 1934, gun-grabbers were out to make sure as few people had access to firearms as possible, let alone anything they thought would make firearms more deadly. As part of the NFA, lots of legal hurdles were put in place to make it as annoyingly difficult as possible for individuals to buy suppressors. Today, while it is not impossible to buy a suppressor, you must: Live in a state where suppressors are legal (sorry CA, NY, or any of the 8 states that hate the 2A); Send in an application to the ATF, including fingerprints and a passport photo; Pay a $200 tax; and Notify your local chief law enforcement officer. After you’ve done all that, you just need to wait up to 14 months to see if you are approved for your suppressor! Easy peasy. Oh, also, your information will be entered into a database of suppressor owners. Just your typical Big Brother stuff. No big deal. What a great looking family If you live in a state where suppressors are legal, congratulations on living in the United States of America!  Just follow those steps, shell out the $200, and wait over a year to get your suppressor. If you don’t, know that 42 other states allow for legal ownership of suppressors.  That’s over 80% of the country. Just saying. And no, the $200 isn’t a typo.  There might be typos somewhere else in this article, but that $200 isn’t one of them.  That amount was set when the NFA was passed back in 1934, with the idea that charging a high tax would discourage people from even bothering to try and buy a suppressor.  In 2019 dollars, the $200 tax would be a little under $3800. With that kind of money, most people would probably spend it on more guns or ammo rather than on buying a single suppressor. The good news is that the $200 tax has not changed since 1934.  The bad news is that nothing else in the NFA has changed either.  The same hurdles are still in place as they were over 80 years ago. A New Challenger Has Appeared! Luckily for us, some of the representatives in elected office are actually trying to do their jobs and, you know, REPRESENT the voters. Weird concept, I know. What’s more, these representatives have been making a push in recent years, as early as 2015, in removing some of the obstacles in our way to getting suppressors. The Hearing Protection Act (HPA) was introduced by a Republican House Representative from Arizona back in 2015.  If passed, the law would have removed suppressors from the NFA, and made the requirements for getting a suppressor the same as those for buying long guns.  Basically, buying a suppressor would just require a background check through the NCIS database to make sure you aren’t a criminal, and you’d be good to go. For some reason, allowing hunters and firearms owners to protect their haring by placing the same requirements that allow people to own guns onto the purchase and ownership of suppressors wasn’t all that popular with our elected officials, and so the HPA bill never went anywhere. Suppressed shotgun. No ear pro. AMERICA! In 2017, there was another push for the HPA, but it was inserted as part of the SHARE Act, which was a pro-2A bill that was aimed at reducing unnecessary burdens on hunters, fishermen, and gun-owners. The SHARE Act, in addition to increasing federal funding for public shooting ranges and opening more federal lands to hunting, fishing, and shooting, would have removed suppressors from the NFA, eliminated the $200 tax, and required the destruction of the registration records of current suppressor owners. Even with a Republican majority in the House of Representatives and the Senate, the SHARE Act didn’t get anywhere, and so died again. Now, in 2019, the HPA has been reintroduced as its own bill, with basically the same goals as the 2015 and 2017 versions.  Unfortunately, with a Democrat majority in the House of Representatives, it’s likely going to suffer the same fate as the previous attempts, and die out before it gets anywhere. Now What? While you can hold out hope for some miracle that the HPA 2019 will pass the House, make it through the Senate, and eventually to the President’s desk to be signed into law, the best chance gun-owners have at having the HPA pass would be if Republicans were able to regain the House and maintain their majority in the Senate in the 2020 elections.  That means we need to get out and vote.  Even you, guy reading this blog on the toilet. Your vote can save future suppressors from a similar fate But There’s More If the HPA is re-introduced once again in 2021, as it was in 2015, 2017, and 2019, and manages to pass through Congress and is signed by President Trump, then get ready to line up for your suppressor orders, because everyone and their grandma will be at the local gun store trying to get their hands on one. Of course, the HPA passing into law doesn’t do much good for the gun-owners living in states where suppressors are illegal.  For those gun-owners, you’ll have to travel to a neighboring state to try out a suppressor and see what you’ve been missing out on. And who knows, it may be just the kick in the butt you need to convince you to move to a free state.  If not, you can always stay behind enemy lines and try to win back some of your 2A rights at the ballot box with your fellow gun-owners. For the time being, it’s unlikely any progress will be made in the law, at least until 2021 if the Republicans can regain the majority in the House, and the Senate and White House remain under Republican control. In the meantime, we can all go out and inform our fellow gun-owning friends, and even those who aren’t interested in firearms, on why suppressors aren’t the scary tubes that make guns silent, but are actually just useful tools to help preserve our hearing so we can continue to hear the sweet sounds of our rounds hitting steel downrange. Now go out and pew pew! Do you rock a suppressor on your rifle/pistol? What kind? Let us know in the comments! Otherwise check out our Best Suppressor Companies …and even Best Electronic Hearing Protection . Three Electronic Earmuffs

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS), sometimes known by the name of its primary governing body, Single Action Shooting Society (SASS), is half-shooting sport, half-costume event, and all fun.  I’m not a CAS shooter myself, so I asked my friend Biloxi Bob to point me in the right direction, and helped me figure out how easy it is to get started with it.  Come along on my journey! Thanks for the help.