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Better known as James Bond’s gun, the Walther PPK is now a 91-year-old handgun design and more of a collector’s item. A once very popular and the world’s first concealed carry handgun now remains a rare sight. But anyway, those who have them will need aftermarket parts at some point.

Best Walther PPK Magazines of 2020

Best Walther PPK Magazines of 2020Better known as James Bond’s gun, the Walther PPK is now a 91-year-old handgun design and more of a collector’s item. A once very popular and the world’s first concealed carry handgun now remains a rare sight. But anyway, those who have them will need aftermarket parts at some point. Such an important and searched part is its magazine. After scouring the online market extensively, we have come up with the best magazines for your Walther PPK. So stay tuned, and keep scrolling. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Walther PPK Magazines OUR TOP PICK: Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine With Finger Rest RUNNER-UP: Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine BEST BUDGET OPTION: Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine BEST WALTHER PPK 22 MAGAZINE: Walther PPK/S .22 LR 10-Round Magazine Nickel BEST WALTHER PPK 380 EXTENDED MAGAZINE: Mec-Gar Walther PPK/S .380 ACP 7-Round Magazine Comparison Chart of the Best Walther PPK Magazines PRODUCT DETAILS Our Top Pick Our Top Pick Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine "With Finger Rest" Original factory 6 round Walther PPK magazine for reliability Steel construction for durability and perfect nickel finish Includes a finger rest to offer good grip while shooting View Latest Price Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine Straight PPK magazine from Mec-gar with 6 round capacity Made from stainless steel and features a polymer finger rest Multiple numbered witness holes on the sides for convenience "View Latest Price" Best Budget Option "Best Budget Option" Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine PPK angled magazine with 6 round capacity Corrosion resistant finish for durability and flush fitting baseplate Large witness holes to keep track of magazine capacity View Latest Price Walther PPK/S .22 LR 10- "Round Magazine Nickel" 10 round 22lr stainless steel magazine with a durable build Corrosion resistant nickel finish and polymer finger rest for shooting comfort Ideal PPK/s magazine for plinking, training and even self defense View Latest Price Mec-Gar Walther PPK/S .380 ACP 7-Round Magazine Stainless steel design with 7 round capacity for the .380 PPK Sturdy steel follower with polymer finger rest and rmovable butt-plate Straight design and large tracking holes with numbers View Latest Price Walther PPK .32 ACP 7-Round Nickel Magazine w/ Finger Rest Specially designed steel 7 round magazine for the Walther PPK .32ACP Stainless steel follower with polymer finger rest and removable butt-plate Wide-cut and numbered witness holes for quickly tracking ammo View Latest Price Are All Walther PPK Magazines The Same Walther PPK magazines are not all the same. The major difference between them is capacity. While some magazines feature the normal OEM 6 round capacity, some have an extended capacity of 7 rounds. Similarly, magazines differ in the type of caliber they hold. The two available calibers for the Walther PPK are .32ACP and .380. While these magazines may differ a bit in length, their overall size is the same. Walther magazines are not really caliber-specific with regards to the .32 and .380 and should be interchangeable. Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine With Finger Rest While 6 round magazines fit flush, others with extended capacities won’t. Additionally, pre-war and post-war magazines differ slightly in design Yes, but for the PPK/s you must get either the PP mags or the PPK/s mags. The PPK mags don't work. They are too short. How to Choose a Walther PPK Magazine Design There are two different types of PPK magazines available on the market. Pre-war and Post-war (referring to WWII). Post-war magazines have a ridge on the side which is not compatible with pre-war PPK handguns because they can’t accommodate that ridge. So keep an eye out for that. Capacity A Walther PPK has a normal OEM capacity of 6 rounds. That can be extended by one round using a 7 round magazine. While the 6 round mag fits flush into the grip , the 7 round mag protrudes a bit. So choose one which suits you the best. Witness Holes Almost all PPK magazines have witness holes on the sides. These allow you to track the amount of ammo remaining and plan your expenditure accordingly. All the magazines reviewed on our list feature witness holes. Durability and Brand Make sure to check the durability of the magazine before you buy. PPK magazines are mostly metal and quite durable to last a lifetime. Mec-Gar manufactures quality aftermarket PPK magazines other than Walther itself. These are the two most trusted brands for buying PPK magazines. Quick Take - The Best Walther PPK Magazines These are our recommendations for the best Walther PPK magazines: Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine With Finger Rest Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine Review of the Best Walther PPK Magazines Keeping the above-mentioned considerations and factors in mind. Let’s take a look at the best Walther PPK magazines available on the market. These differ in caliber, size, capacity, and build-material to offer versatility while choosing. Best Walther PPK Magazine: Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine With Finger Rest CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Aesthetically pleasing nickel finish Durable and reliable OEM magazine Numbered witness holes on the side Includes finger rest for better handling Cons None we could find What Recent Buyers Report This magazine functions flawlessly with the PPK. Plus there’s a sense of trust among the buyers because this is an OEM replacement magazine. Another very appreciated factor was the ideal price of this magazine, which allows a buyer to procure multiple units at once. Why it Stands Out to Us The very basic and obvious reason is that this is an OEM replacement magazine manufactured by Walther. This eliminates any chances of fitting or functional issues. The nickel plating is both good-looking and protective for the magazine. The pinky-rest on the bottom helps with handling and the witness holes are a plus. Who Will Use This Most The magazine is ideal to be carried as a backup or spare with the PPK. Being an OEM magazine, it will be a reliable option. Additionally, the design of the magazine also makes it suitable for self-defense and range use. Bottom Line This is an original Walther PPK magazine from the manufacturer itself. It fits and functions perfectly with the handgun, and features a finger rest on the bottom to improve handling. The price of this magazine is just perfect to let you buy multiple units for EDC or practice. Runner-up: Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Works as well as OEM’s Durable all-steel construction Almost half the price of OEM magazines Flush fitting baseplate and large witness holes Cons Doesn’t suit pre-war models "What Recent Buyers" Report An almost zero-complaint aftermarket magazine for the PPK. The fit, finish, and function are just perfect. The best part of buying these magazines is their unbelievable cost, which is far less than the original Walther PPK mags. Why it Stands Out to Us This magazine is perfect in fit and function compared to the original Walther magazines, but almost half in price. If you are looking for a low-priced alternative to original Walther mags, this will be your go-to choice. The magazine is full steel, has witness holes and will last for years to come. Who Will "Use This Most" This magazine is a budget option for people who like to keep a bunch of extra mags for their weapons. These magazines are suitable for range use since you can afford them in bulk and drop them without worrying about damage. While also suitable for EDC, these mags find a better use at the range. Bottom Line The Mec-Gar Walther PPK magazines are utterly reliable and have a low price tag compared to Walther factory mags. These magazines feature a steel follower, witness holes and have a full-steel body to withstand the harshest conditions. Best for the Money: Mec-Gar Walther PPK .380 ACP 6-Round Magazine CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Fits flush inside the grip Durable construction with steel follower Flush fitting 6 round 380 ACP magazines Very inexpensive and affordable magazines Cons Lacks a finger rest Features only a single witness hole What Recent Buyers Report Despite having a basic design with minimal features, these magazines have no negative customer reviews. Buyers appreciate the high quality and sturdy build quality of these magazines and report them to function flawlessly in all conditions. The astoundingly low price is also a driving factor for buyers. Why it Stands Out to Us The magazine is durable and simple. It fits flush inside the grip and doesn’t protrude. Which means it creates a more compact package and helps with concealment. The magazine is almost half in price than the OEM magazines which is the most attractive feature for some buyers. Who Will Use This Most The magazine is suitable for people with small palms and those who don’t face problems cupping the grip with ease. The combination of low price and durable construction makes these magazines suitable for range use and bulk procurement. These mags fit flush and will impress concealed carriers to some extent. Bottom Line The Mec-Gar magazine features a simple, inexpensive, and reliable design with a flush-fitting design to help with concealment. The magazine is suitable for range use and EDC. Best Walther PPK/S 22 Magazine: Walther PPK/S .22 LR 10-Round Magazine Nickel CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Durable stainless steel construction Features a finger rest for better handling Manufactured by Walther and fits perfectly Nickel-plated finish to resist corrosion and wear Cons Made for the PPK/s. PPK doesn’t come in .22 What Recent Buyers Report These are new Walther original factory magazines and work as expected with the PPK/s. The fit and finish of the magazine are perfect and the details stamped on the sides make it look even more amazing. This is a perfect match for the .22LR PPK/s handgun with a fair price tag. Why it Stands Out to Us The magazine is an OEM product and features an impeccable construction and finish. The 10 round capacity is optimal and the extra finger rest on the bottom helps with improving the grip. The witness holes are just perfect and numbered for precise tracking. Who Will Use This Most The magazine is perfect for replacement or backup with the PPK/s .22LR. While the .22LR is often used for casual shooting and sometimes for EDC, these magazines are an inexpensive and viable option to let you carry extra magazines. Bottom Line While the PPK doesn’t come chambered in a .22LR. These magazines are designed for the PPK/s. These are an affordable aftermarket backup or replacement for your PPK/s and will function flawlessly being an OEM product. Best Walther PPK/S 380 Extended Magazine: Mec-Gar Walther PPK/S .380 ACP 7-Round Magazine CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Features a 7 round capacity Low price and great value for money Available in blued and nickel-plated finish Removable butt plate with durable steel follower Cons Sticks out about a quarter of an inch What Recent Buyers Report Quality product fits perfectly and solid construction. Almost 99% of buyers report these same points in their reviews. This magazine features impeccable quality and works perfectly well with the handgun. Why it Stands Out to Us This magazine has a full-steel construction and all the qualities of a perfect magazine. Chambered in .380 ACP, this magazine carries an extra round. Thus extending the normal capacity by one more round. The polymer base plate has a finger rest to improve the grip and handling. Who Will Use This Most People who want to carry some extra ammo for their PPK will find this magazine useful. It will come in handy when multiple magazines are carried at once. These are great for EDC and self-defense applications. Plus also for range use if you don’t bother marring the beautiful finish. Bottom Line This magazine is marketed for PPK/s, however, it will fit a PPK while sticking out a bit. It is an affordable and reliable replacement/backup mag for the PPK, allowing you to carry one extra round. It is suitable for range use, EDC, and defense. Best Walther PPK .32 ACP Magazine: Walther PPK .32 ACP 7- "Round Nickel Magazine" w/ Finger Rest CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Finger rest improves handling Factory original Walther 7 round magazine Corrosion-resistant nickel finish adds durability Side witness holes, steel follower and good spring Cons Aesthetics aren’t very pleasing What Recent Buyers Report The fit and function of the magazine are fine. However, some users reported some scratches on the delivered product. But users didn’t mind them because these magazines are very rare. The polymer finger rest is a useful feature and the price is impressive. Why it Stands Out to Us The magazine is an OEM product and features durable construction. The components are all steel except the polymer finger rest. The magazine serves all the functions expected with efficacy and is priced reasonably well to let users buy multiple units. Who Will Use This Most Any PPK .32ACP user would like getting two or three of these. Generally due to the fact that .32 ACP mags for Walther PPK can sometimes be hard to find. These mags are suitable for overall use and will last longer due to their solid construction. Bottom Line A good magazine with an appropriate price tag. These .32ACP magazines have been manufactured by Walther and perform exceptionally well with the handgun. The finger rest is a good addition, and disassembling these mags for maintenance is very easy. Conclusion Walther PPK is a classic concealed carry weapon and is still used by many people. Having a good set of magazines greatly improves the reliability of the firearm and ensures you don’t lose in a life or death situation. People Also Ask Find answers to some common questions and misconceptions associated with the Walther PPK and its variants in the FAQ section below: What is the Difference Between Walther PPK and PPK S? The PPK/s is a resized version of the famous PPK, which was made to legally import the PPK into the United States after the 1968 ban. The PPK/s is a combination of the PPK and PP models. The PPK/s is heavier, has a 0.4 inch longer grip than the PPK and carries one more round in .380, but all other dimensions are exactly the same. Does Walther Still Make the PPK/S? Yes. However, the production of the PPK/s was halted in 2012, the gun has made a comeback and is now being manufactured in Fort Smith, Arkansas at the factory of US-based subsidiary Walther Arms, Inc.

Forbes Nails It: How Sheriffs Play a Role in Denying Gun Grabbers Victory

Forbes Nails It: How Sheriffs Play a Role in Denying Gun Grabbers Victory

We cannot forget that many sheriffs in ban states have simply said “no” to enforcing UN-constitutional gun laws. Why we need more sheriffs like Mike Lewis. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print visit website

Best Handheld Ham Radio for Survival in 2020: Expert Analysis

Best Handheld Ham Radio for Survival in 2020: Expert Analysis

Communication is critical.  In an emergency, communication is even more critical. Area-wide disasters can cripple our ability to communicate.  Recent events show us how quickly we can lose cell phone service, the internet, and even traditional telephone service.  Maintaining communication with your family and friends must be a priority in these kinds of circumstances. Ham, or Amateur Radio, can provide the best and most reliable communication in the event of an area-wide disaster. Handheld Ham radios are ideal for this purpose.  Handheld HAM radios are battery-operated, free from wires, and other supporting systems.  Handheld radios don’t need cell phone towers or internet providers. A handheld HAM radio can keep you in touch at the press of a button. Before diving deep, here is a summary of our top picks. We spent countless hours narrowing down this list. HAM RADIO DETAILS #1 Ham Radio #1 Ham Radio BaoFeng BF-F8HP Good battery life. Relatively easy to program. Two-channel monitoring capability. Check Price on Amazon.com TYT MD-UV 380 Digital and analog operations. Long battery life and runtime. Easy to see screen in all light conditions. Check Price on Amazon.com BaoFeng UV-5R Metal case for durability. Color Display for easy reading. Built-in flashlight is handy. Check Price on Amazon.com Quick Navigation What is a Handheld Ham Radio? How I Choose a Handheld Ham Radio for Survival Best Survival Ham Radios: My Top 5 Picks 1. Best Handheld Ham Radio For Survival (Overall) – BaoFeng BF-F8HP Review 2. Runner Up – Yaesu FT-65R Review 3. Best Digital Handheld Ham Radio – TYT MD-UV 380 Review 4. Best Ultimate Handheld Ham Radio – Kenwood TH-d74A Review Cons 5. Best Budget Handheld Ham Radio – BaoFeng UV-5R Review Open Questions About Ham Radios Do I need a License to Operate a Handheld Ham Radio? Why can’t I use the radios sold at the big sporting goods stores? Why do I need a license?  My friend told me that in an emergency, it is legal to operate a Ham radio with one. Other Alternative Radio Options GMRS/FRS CB radios Things to Keep In Mind About Communication Text Messaging EMP Blast/Solar Event Considerations (Electromagnetic Pulse) Getting On The Air What is a Handheld Ham Radio? Ham radio, properly known as Amateur Radio, refers to the use of a specific range of frequencies set aside by the International Telecommunications Union and regulated in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission. The range of frequencies, or the frequency spectrum that is allocated to Ham radio operators stretched from the high frequencies to the ultra-high frequency bands giving Ham operators a wide range of capabilities.  A properly equipment Ham operator can talk across town, across the country, or across the oceans. These capabilities make handheld radios operating in the Ham radio frequencies a perfect choice for anyone preparing for an emergency.  I have been a licensed Ham radio operator for many years.  I was drawn to Ham radio because I wanted to be able to stay in touch no matter what the conditions. How I Choose a Handheld Ham Radio for Survival I base my choices on my expectations that, at some point, the handheld radio may be my only source of information and communication.   I look for several features in any handheld radio I put into my bugout bag, my get home bag, or for my everyday carry.   Yes, I do try and carry a handheld Ham radio with me.  You never know when you may need it. Rugged and durable – I carry a handheld radio every day.  It goes in my EDC bag, briefcase or backpack.  That means it takes some abuse and it needs to be able to withstand that kind of wear and tear and operate consistently. Easy to use – Many handheld Ham radios on the market are loaded with extra features that you won’t ever use in an emergency.  These extra features add cost and can decrease battery runtime significantly.  The more features you add, the more complicated it gets to operate the radio.  In an emergency, I want the easiest to use handheld Ham radio I can find. Dual-Band Capability – Handheld Ham radios are designed to work in the UHF and VHF bands.  Any radio that goes into my emergency kits must operate on both bands.  Each band has capabilities that make it preferred under certain conditions.  It is important to have the option to switch frequency bands when necessary. Emergency Frequency monitoring – The FCC has set aside certain bands and frequencies that are used by government agencies for emergency broadcasts.  The best known of these is the NOAA weather frequencies.  I want my emergency handheld Ham radio to be able to receive these broadcasts. Accessories – There are certain accessories that I want for any handheld Ham radio I put into my kit.  At the bare minimum, I want a spare battery.  I also look for charging adapters that will let me recharge batteries under emergency circumstances such as an adapter for a car data power port or solar. Cost – Last on my list is cost.  Budget is always a consideration for most of us.  I look for the best balance of features and cost that I can find.  Fortunately, in the past few years, the cost of handheld Ham radios has come down drastically, and the quality of these cheaper radios has increased dramatically. Best Survival Ham Radios: My Top 5 Picks There are hundreds of handheld Ham radios on the market.  A quick search on Google or on Amazon returns a huge number of brands, many with what are obviously of Chinese origin.  There are a few caveats about buying these radios. Check the shipping point – Many of the handheld ham radios being sold on Amazon are shipped from China.  This can add weeks to getting your radio.  More importantly, it makes getting service on the radio almost impossible.  Buy from a dealer who warehouses the radios in the US, ships from a US location, and is reachable if a problem arises. Its what’s inside the case that matters – Many of the radios being sold on Amazon and other places are the same radio with a slightly different case and faceplate.  I have found when disassembling some of these different brand name radios that they are identical under the skin.  Buying from a known reputable firm is your best method of getting what you pay for. Make sure your radio is FCC approved. – All Ham radios approved for us in the United States will have, and FCC imprint on the packaging, printed in the user manual, and a sticker attached somewhere on the radio indicating that it has passed the FCC inspection. With those cautions out of the way, let’s look at my choices for the best handheld HAM radios for survival situations. 1. Best Handheld Ham Radio For Survival (Overall) – BaoFeng BF-F8HP Review This is my go-to radio for everyday carry.  One of these goes in my day bag when I leave the house.  The get home bags in our vehicles are all equipped with a BaoFeng BF-8HP.  I bought my first BaoFeng radio when my store was open, and it was my first Ham radio.  I upgraded each time BaoFeng released a newer and better model. The BaoFeng is an 8-watt handheld Ham radio on VHF, drops to 7-watts on UHF (read about VHF vs UHF here ).  Most other handhelds only produce 4 watts of output power.  The frequency range of the BF-F8HP covers the UHF and VHF frequencies.  The emergency bands are also available for monitoring as well as the frequencies used by the sport type walkie-talkies in the GMRS and MURS frequency ranges. You can also tune in your favorite FM radio station.  This may seem strange, but remember that the emergency planners in most cities and states will rely on FM broadcasters to deliver emergency information.  This can be an asset. The features on the BaoFeng BF-F8HP include: 8 watts of output power Hardened case V-85 high-gain antenna included Three power settings enable battery saving for extended run time FM Frequencies (commercial radio, receive only) VHF Frequencies (receive and transmit) UHF Frequencies (receive and transmit) Narrow/Broadband switchable Computer programmable Wide range of accessories available One of my favorite things about the BaoFeng radios is the huge number of accessories that are readily available.   You can easily source extra batteries, a variety of adapters to charge the batteries from any power source, headset and microphones, upgraded antennas, carrying cases, and much more. Pros Most affordable radio with these kinds of features Good battery life Relatively easy to program Two-channel monitoring capability FM receiver built-in Cons The programming cable is not included Not waterproof BaoFeng BF-F8HP (UV-5R 3rd Gen) 8-Watt Dual Band Two-Way Radio (136-174MHz... Upgrades from our Previous Generation UV-5R: Twice the Output Power (8 watts up from 4 watts... High / Med / Low Power Settings (8W, 4W, 1W); Frequency Range: 65-108 MHz(Only commercial FM radio... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 01:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 2. Runner Up – Yaesu FT-65R Review Yaesu is one of the best-known brands in the Ham radio world, so it is no surprise that their FT-65R handheld Ham radio comes in at the runner up spot on my list.  I have used the FT-65R during disaster drills and other evolutions, and I have been impressed with the operation of this little radio. The Yaesu FT-65R has almost all the features of the BaoFeng BF-F8HT, with exception of it’s power being 5 watts and a limited 200 channels.  The Yaesu doesn’t include the FM receiver into their radio.  This was the biggest factor in my decision to make the Yaesu the runner up instead of my top pick for best overall survival handheld Ham radio. Yaesu doesn’t skimp on quality or features.  Buying a brand name can be a big part of a purchase decision for some people and you won’t go wrong choosing a Yaesu radio.  A look at the features included with the Yaesu FT-65R should convince you. Aluminum case Water-resistant 5 watts of output power Three available power settings Great battery run time Dual-frequency operation covers UHF and VHF 1,000 memory channels Emergency frequency receiver operation I do like the rugged aluminum case on the FT-65R.  It is certainly more durable than radios with plastic cases.  On the other hand, I have never cracked or broken one of my handheld Ham radios with a plastic case. Pros Great display that is easy to read even in daylight Locking mode prevents inadvertent frequency changes Easy to program Accessible and simple controls and knobs Cons Doesn’t include the programming cable The menu structure can be hard to navigate and understand Only show (and listen to) one VFO or frequency at a time (e.g., can’t listen to weather on one channel and your frequency on another, only one at a time) Yaesu Original FT-65 FT-65R 144/440 Dual-Band Rugged & Compact Handheld... Offers up to 5W of output power along with lower power settings of 2.5W and 0.5W. Boasts an IP54 rating along with MIL-810-C, D and E. See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 02:08 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API 3. "Best Digital Handheld" Ham Radio – TYT MD-UV 380 Review TYT has established itself as a real competitor in the handheld and mobile Ham radio markets.  TYT first came to my attention with their mobile line of radios, and I mounted a TYT-9800 tri-band radio in one of my vehicles for many years.   It proved to be tough and reliable.  But that is a review for another time. The TYT-MD-UV 380 is a full-featured handheld Ham radio plus it includes many of the new digital ham radio features that are becoming more and more popular among Ham radio operators.  If you must have DMR digital capability, this is probably the radio you should consider for your survival handheld radio needs. DMR is an acronym for Digital Mobil Radio.  This technology harnesses the latest innovations in combining ham radio technology with the internet.  When you have access to a DMR repeater station, you can communicate with other DMR radios around the world.  Your radio transmission is converted to digital signals and sent over the internet to all the other DMR stations in the net, where it is rebroadcast over the radio. This is a great technology in a lot of ways, but in a true emergency, this technology doesn’t gain you much, especially if the internet is down or you don’t have access to a DMR repeater.  However, the TYT MD-UV 380 is certainly well worth a place on our list.  Digital capability, along with a full feature list, gets the TYT MD-UV 380 a place on our list as the Best Digital Survival Handheld Ham Radio. Digital and analog Combined 3000 programmable channels and up to 100,000 contacts Firmware upgradeable FCC Certified 5 watts of output power Long-lasting 2000mAh battery Easy operation High-resolution screen The other major downside to the TYT MD-UV 380 is it is a single frequency radio.  It only operates in the 400-470mHz range limiting its usefulness in an emergency, in my opinion. Also, note that there are multiple digital radio formats available in the market that don’t easily talk to one another. So if one user is using a MotoTrbo type radio (be it TYT) and someone else in your group is using D-Star digital, they cannot talk to one another using those digital formats. Pros Digital and analog operations Includes the programming cable and software Long battery life and runtime Easy to see screen in all light conditions Cons Single-frequency operation The programming software can be confusing and hard to use. TYT MD-UV380 with GPS MD380 VHF/UHF 136-174Mhz/400-480Mhz MD-380 Dual Band... TYT MD-UV380 GPS model is a Dual Band DMR/Analog radio Compatible with Mototrbo Tier Ⅰ & Ⅱ Dual... Color LCD display Transmit interruption Private/Group call match off = Promiscuous on Digital and... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 02:08 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 4. "Best Ultimate Handheld" Ham Radio – Kenwood TH-d74A Review Kenwood is one of my favorite Ham radio brands.  Their equipment is hard to beat in any of the many configurations available.  I have a Kenwood high-frequency radio in my Ham station and use it regularly. The quality of the handheld Ham radios doesn’t suffer either. The Kenwood TH-d74A is our premium pick.  I will warn you before you go and check prices that this is not a cheap radio.  It doesn’t even qualify as a moderately priced radio.  However, if you want a radio that is loaded with features that you don’t normally find in a handheld Ham radio, this is the pick you want. Not only do you get digital and analog radio functions including compatibility with the D-Star digital radio system, but the Kenwood TH-d74A also has a built-in GPS position receiver that allows you to use APRS, the advance packet reporting system, to send location information automatically to other radios equipped with this feature.  The feature list continues with: SiRFstar III GPS receiver GPS logger functions Built-in TNC means direct GPS communications with no external or extra equipment needed Stand-alone digipeater functions Computer programmable MIL-STD810 weatherproofing High capacity battery for long operation Multiple power modes Dual receive function 1000 memory channels Nine scan modes This is just a shortlist of the vast array of features and capabilities of this radio.  The Kenwood TH-d74A is on my personal wish list to add to my collection of Ham radios.  It is, without a doubt, my choice as the Best Ultimate Survival Handheld Ham Radio. Pros Too many features to list adequately.  This is a do it all handheld Ham radio Digital and analog operation GPS, APRS, D-Star function built-in Easy to navigate menu structure Great programming software Cons Complicated and has a steep learning curve The manual that is included is not well written Kenwood Original TH-D74A 144/220/430 MHz Triband with Ultimate in APRS and... APRS compliance using packet communication to exchange real-time GPS position information and... Built-in high performance GPS unit with Auto Clock Setting Wide-band and multi-mode reception... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 05:48 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 5. "Best Budget Handheld" Ham Radio – BaoFeng UV-5R Review Want a budget handheld Ham radio without a budget list of features.   To be honest, this is probably my favorite handheld Ham radio.   There are 8 of them sitting in a rack charger at the back of my office.  In an emergency, I can hand them out to friends and neighbors so I can keep the lines of communications open. The budge price of these little radios makes that possible.  You can purchase these radios on Amazon for less than $40.  There is no cheaper way to get into a handheld Ham radio than the BaoFeng UV-5R.  Just because they are cheap doesn’t mean you have to give up features, reliability, or capability. 128 programmable channels Dual-frequency operation Dual display Scan and monitor functions FM radio receiver Flashlight Emergency locator sound High and low power operation Wide and narrowband operation Computer programmable Wide array of accessories Optional larger battery for longer runtimes These are great radios.  If you are on a budget but want to add emergency Ham radio capabilities to your kit, you can’t go wrong with the BaoFeng UV-5R. NOTE: If you opt for the UV-5R, I suggest you also purchase at least one of the extended batteries.  You can find them on Amazon here. Pros Metal case for durability Color Display for easy reading Built-in flashlight is handy Perfect beginning Ham radio Cons The programming cable is not included The buttons on the keypad are small and hard to find with gloves on. Sale BaoFeng UV-5R Dual Band Two Way Radio (Black) 128 Channels 50 ctcss and 104 CDCSS dual-band display, Dual Freq. Display, dual-standby, a/B band... Tri-color background light selectable: 0-9 grades vox selectable | FM radio (65.0Mhz-108.0MHz) |... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 05:38 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API "Open Questions About" Ham Radios Do I need a License to Operate a Handheld Ham Radio? Yes.  You are required to get a license to operate a Ham radio.  For the basic operation of the radios I have reviewed, you need at least a Technician license.  The new licensing rules make it easy for anyone to get into the Ham radio world.  For more information about getting an Amateur Radio License, check out this website. Also, check out this YouTube channel for various videos on the topic. Why can’t I use the radios sold at the big sporting goods stores? The walkie-talkies sold at the big sporting goods stores and other retailers are not meant for true emergency communications.  These lower power (often only 2 or 3 watts) operate in a completely different range of frequencies that limits their reach sometimes to less than half a mile.  These types of radios are meant for very short-range casual use by hikers, campers, and other outdoor uses. Why do I need a license?  My friend told me that in an emergency, it is legal to operate a Ham radio with one. It’s true.  The FCC regulations have a provision that anyone can use a Ham radio in an emergency without a license.  The key here is the emergency.  To learn and understand how to operate your radio properly, you need to practice and train.  To operate that radio legally during practice and training, you need the license. "Other Alternative Radio" Options HAM radios not ideal for you? Let’s discuss some alternatives. The three most readily available radio options are GMRS or FRS radios, CB radios , and of course ham radio as we covered. GMRS/FRS These survival radios are good for short distances with little terrain interference. Used as pagers/communicators inside a building or a camp, GMRS/FRS radios offer low-cost & convenience. Small and easy to carry, GMRS/FRS radio family biggest drawback is their range and their battery life.  Some of the manufacturers report that these survival radios will work up to 35 miles, but that is 35 miles over a flat surface with no interference.  Once you start putting trees, hills, houses, etc in the way the range drops dramatically.  While fine as a short range group communications tool, they lack the ability of medium or long range communications. CB radios Around for several years as an offshoot of Ham Radio, CB does not require a license and unlike amateur radio, it may be used for business as well as personal communications.  Enjoying a boom in the mid-seventies and are readily available today, CB radios are still the main short-range communications choice for truckers. You can find CB’s fairly cheaply at yard sales, craigslist , eBay, and flea markets.  Mandated by regulation as a low power device, the range on these radios is much greater when combined with a signal amplifier, or “Linear” Amp.  It is not advocated using a linear amp, however for the most part, enforcement of the restrictions are few and often only when an illegal stations signal interferes with other communication methods.  Long distance communication is possible when atmospheric conditions permit.  CB radios come in many different forms, ranging from legal 40 channel/4 watt models, to a grey-area type of “export radio”, that skirts legality by being built for ham radio use, but are easily modified for the CB band. Operating within the 10-12 Meter HF Band, CB radios need a longer antenna than UHF/VHF GMRS/FRS radios. Things to Keep In "Mind About Communication" Text Messaging It has been reported that during Hurricane Katrina, the only reliable way to communicate was by Text Messaging.  This is a good piece of information to know if you are caught off guard in the next crisis.  While everyone else is desperately trying to call, you might be able to get your messages through via text.  I would recommend planning as if Text Messaging will not work and if the crisis spills into multiple weeks you can bet that the service will no longer work at some point but this is still good information to know. EMP Blast/ "Solar Event Considerations" (Electromagnetic Pulse) Because we are talking about electronics and two of the scenarios which many people plan for is an EMP type blast or the more likely scenario, a Solar Storm Event like the one that took place in 1859 ( Carrington Event ).  Because these threats are very real, you should try to store your critical electronics in a protective case.  One of the ways you can protect yourself from this scenario is by storing your survival radios and critical electronics in a Faraday cage.  While we are not going to go into “How to Build a Faraday Cage” in this article, I can assure you that there are a lot of examples out there, such as this one: Getting On The Air Staying in touch with family and friends when every other form of communication is unavailable is a situation that requires planning and preparation.  Having the equipment and the knowledge to make that communications work is part of being prepared. For me, the best way for anyone to begin that preparation is to purchase the right radio, get the proper license, and then train with that radio on a regular basis. The BaoFeng BF-F8HP will get you the most features I feel are important in a survival handheld Ham radio at the best possible price.  This little radio is great for the beginner and has a place with the most experienced amateur radio operator. Other interesting articles: Survival Without Firearms: Ultimate Expert Guide Top 7 Best Survival Hatchet Reviews for 2020 The Bare Bones Minimalist Survival Kit for 2020 Top 6 Best Survival Multi Tool Reviews for 2020: Hands-On

The SIG Sauer P238: My Review of the Classic Pocket Pistol

The SIG Sauer P238: My Review of the Classic Pocket Pistol

If you are looking for a good self-defense pocket .380, the Sig Sauer P238 has as many fans as it has detractors. So, what is it about this pistol that some people absolutely love (and others hate)? @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 The "Sig Sauer P238" : a Classic Pocket Carry Handgun 2 Breakdown 3 Maintenance 4 Reliability 5 Comfort 6 Durability 7 Caliber vs. Accuracy 8 Safety 9 Technique 10 Starter Kit 11 Accessories 12 Final Word The Sig Sauer P238: a Classic "Pocket Carry Handgun" The inspiration for the Sig Sauer P238 is a gun everyone is familiar with, the Colt 1911 . With the ability to shoot .45 caliber bullets, the Colt was a favorite for over 100 years and then a company called Sig Sauer came along and decided to design a scaled down version of the 1911. After buying the rights to the Colt Mustang, they made a few changes and then released it as the Sig P238 to the world. Similar to the 1911, it is a single action, semi-auto pistol that features a slide release level and a manual safety. Experienced shoots will identify with the exposed hammer and the compact, single-action pistol from the 1911. Operating similarly to other single-action autoloaders, the P238 also features a single-stack, 6-round magazine and a manual slide lock that is located above the magazine release button on the left side. The trigger features a serrated design that has a single-stage release. There are several types of P238s that are offered by Sig Sauer with varying metal finishes, sight set-ups, and grips materials. It also comes equipped with fixed sights that have the SIGLite luminous design. The front sight features a combinations green fiber optic and Tritium blend while the rear sight has a drift-adjustable, two-dot Tritium is necessary. Easily fitting into your pocket, the P238 is made of all metal, giving it a sturdier feel than many of its polymer competitors. Despite all its metal, you won’t feel any more weight on it than a polymer pocket pistol. Plus, it has a thumb safety that is a little still but will easily disengage when you need to take it off. Breakdown The P238 has a similar break down to the 1911. After you move the slide back a few of the indentations will line up, you can then pull out the lever for the slide release and then push the slide forward to pull out the spring and the barrel. As you reassemble the P238, make sure to push the ejector down so you can get the slide back onto the frame. If you aren’t careful with the ejector, it can be damaged. 4 out 5 for Ease-of-Assembly. Maintenance After you get through the break down process, you will find that it doesn’t have a lot to clean. With such a small barrel, there just isn’t a lot of area to clean up. Which also means it doesn’t take long to clean this gun. Also, keep an eye on the hammer area if you pocket carry, you can clean this area out with compressed air to get any lint that might build up in that area. 5 out 5 for Maintenance. Reliability With many pocket pistols, you have to be very careful as they can have a tendency to be finicky. You often see manuals with warnings to only use a very specific type of ammo. The P238 doesn’t have that issue. It is a solid gun that won’t malfunction with cheaper ammo. 5 out of 5 for Reliability. Comfort Everyone knows that we come in different sizes and shapes, especially our hands. So, a pistol that might work for one person may be too small or large for someone else. That is not a problem with the Sig P238 as it can work for many sized hands. The P238 is pretty small when you compare it to other large caliber gun and even to some .22 pistols. It’s size, however, makes it one of the best choices for concealed carry on the market today , but that still means that some can find it hard to hold because their fingers will dangle off of the bottom. I should mention, that “ It’s too small! ” is a complaint I frequently hear from guys who carry the P238. Women, on the other hand, seem to love the gun. Hence why the P238 and its cousin, the Sig Sauer P250, are some of the best handguns for women available today. The extended magazine can help to increase our grip length and its capacity by one round. Even with small hands, having the extended magazine helps with holding it better. The grip on the P238 does not have finger grooves. For some people, not being able to fit your fingers and grip the grooves properly means that this will be unable to hold the gun correctly. 4 out 5 for Comfort. Durability P238s, while overall quite durable, have a common issue with grip screws coming loose and falling out. This is due to the clash between the aluminum frame and the steel screws, which are used to attach the grip panels. The threads can stripped when the screws are overtightened. The stainless-steel frame P238’s don’t seem to have the same problem though . Also, replacing the recoil spring should after a few thousand rounds is inexpensive and helps to increase the service life of your handgun. 3.5 out of 5 for Durability. Caliber vs. Accuracy There have been critics that have been concerned with a .380’s ability to provide enough self-protection because it does not have a high enough caliber. Several other smaller pistols have small magazine capacities which is why it is important to improve your own proficiency and accuracy with a smaller pistol. Since the P238 only has a barrel length of only 2.7 inches , it is consider by many shooters as a “ close range ” pistol, or with 7 yards or closer. The P238 is more than adequate for hitting targets out to 25 yards. 5 out of 5 for Accuracy. Safety When you are considering safety, remember that this is a small 1911. Some people may not feel comfortable keeping it in a cocked and locked position, but don’t worry the SIG Sauger P238 has a bunch of safety features . Included on the P238 is a manual safety. Some people are not fond of the manual safety on a carry pistol, but it only requires that you are properly trained to disengage the safety on the draw so it won’t be a problem. Close up look at the Sig Sauer P238 safety mechanism. ( h/t Sig Talk ) It also features a hammer safety, a firing pin safety block, and a disconnector that keep the pistol from being able to fire if you don’t have the slide locked into the right position. 5 out 5 for Safety Technique Many pocket pistols are not only temperamental, they are also unforgiving with a tight tolerance and not a lot of room for mistakes. The P238 does not have the same issue as it is not easy to get the gun to malfunction. Some smaller pistols with a really petite barrel can have a surprising muzzle flip even more so than a large caliber gun. The P238 is equipped with a very light recoil which makes it aim easily as well as getting your shots on target easily. 5 out of 5 for Technique Starter Kit Don’t expect a lot from the starter kit that comes with the P238. It only comes with a decent quality case made of plastic and a single six round magazine although some modes also come with a laser sight. 2.5 out of 5 for the Starter Kit Accessories When it comes to smaller pistols, you don’t have a lot of room for upgrades or accessories. There are some laser sights that you can purchase just for this gun made by several manufacturers. You can also purchase extra magazines, but keep in mind that they are a little pricey. The one area that has a lot of great options is the grips. Since they are removable, you have some versatility in that area. With the ability to add and change grips at your leisure, this adds to the P238’s comfort — and, it opens the possibility for using some colorful grip designs. You can also purchase different sights for beyond the laser sights, although the sights that it comes with work very well, so you may not have any interest in upgrading them. 4 out of 5 for Accessories Final Word Serving a purpose in the pocket pistol category, the Sig Sauer P238 is a gun you won’t mind taking to the range a lot , especially since it is always a good idea to practice with the gun you carry. Due to its size, you can’t expect to have fast reloads and the safety does require you to readjust your hold to disengage. It does work well with any type of ammunition which is a great feature since other pocket pistols tend to be picky. The SIG Sauer P238 is a great gun to carry and to shoot. If you want a gun that is small and concealable, the P239 is a good choice. SIG Sauer’s P238 pistol gets a solid 4.5 out of 5. Click here to check the current sale price. Related Reads: Best SIG Sauer P238 Holster SIG Sauer P365 SIG MCX Sig P226 VS. Sig P229 Appendix Holster For Sig P320 Best Sig P229 Holster Best Sig P938 Pocket Holsters "Sig Sauer P250" Sig Sauer P220 Holsters Best Sig P226 Holster 3.3/5 (11 Reviews) Chris Browning Hey everyone I'm Chris. Founder and editor at Gun News Daily. This site was originally started by my father who passed it on to me. "Gun News Daily" has been reporting on gun news and conservative politics since 2001. We are the original gun news source. Life-long Second Amendment Supporter. 2 COMMENTS Rick September 6, 2019 at 11:19 am Thanks for the excellent review, it helped a friend a lot. Reply Michael Frazier December 12, 2019 at 6:09 am I was and early purchaser of a Sig Sauer P238, in 2010. In my case, it would barely get through a magazine without a FTE or stovepipe. It went back to Sig once, but was the same when I received it back. After my persistence in firing several hundred rounds, it “settled down” and became reliable. I’m glad, as I really love to shoot the thing. It is very accurate out to 25 yards, as you mention. The trigger has a sharp break, and I like the serrations. It usually finds a place in my range bag, as I hate to leave it behind. I believe my original bad experience was exceptional, and due to it being new in manufacture. I’ve not read of others having the same issues. I believe one purchased now will be perfectly reliable, as stated! Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

Best 1911 Pistols For the Money [2020]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The most recognizable handgun in the world is the M1911 . Old Colt 1911 John Moses Browning’s tried and true design hasn’t changed much over the years, but now there are some new features and more calibers…opening this pistol up to even more shooters. But, where do you start ? Some 1911s There are so many different types of 1911s on the market that almost no one knows where to start.  The good news is that there’s a perfect 1911 for you at your preferred budget. Whether you’re scraping the bottom of the barrel to put enough cash together so you can join the club, or you’re looking to spend your tax refund on a high end 1911…we’ve got you covered! Table of Contents Loading... Quick Background History of M1911 But first…a little history of the 100+-year-old design.  I promise this will shine some light on how to choose the best 1911 for yourself. Genius firearms inventor John Moses Browning (so famous on forums that he is just JMB) sought out to give the military a more potent handgun round. JMB He was in direct competition with other gun makers like Smith & Wesson and Savage…and in March 1911 his auto-loading pistol was officially adopted by the US Military as their sidearm of choice. The 1911 stood up to a 6,000 round torture test, being submerged in mud, acid, shooting deformed cartridges, and other tests. Not only did Browning’s design (to be produced by Colt) pass with flying colors, it was the only gun to pass all stages of this grueling test. .45 ACP The military needed a deadlier handgun round than the .38 Long Colt being used at the turn of the century and wanted it to utilize a .45 caliber bullet.  The Army had a long history with forty-five caliber cartridges, with the Single Action Army revolver (SAA) being used for many years. Colt "Single Action Army" The ultimate replacement would be John Browning’s 1911 chambered in .45 Automatic (AKA .45 ACP, .45 Auto, .45 Automatic Colt Pistol). .45 ACP Ball vs Hollowpoint This .45 Auto contained a 230-grain projectile capable of reaching speeds of about 850 feet per second and was much more capable as a self-defense round than the .38 Long Colt was. Learn more about calibers in our Basic Bullet Guide . Popular Pistol Calibers Other 1911 Manufacturers Many purists decry other brands of 1911s (or calibers) as fakes…unworthy to bear the name. One thing that many people don’t realize, however, is that the demand for them was so high during the war, that Colt contracted out to other companies to help keep production numbers up. Some very well-known companies helped, to include Remington Rand, Ithaca, Springfield Armory, many foreign companies, and even the Singer sewing machine company. Singer 1911 In fact, the pistols from these other companies can command a very high price when sold.  Some of the Singer pistols can be worth up to $30,000 to the right buyer because so few were made. Modern Uses The 1911 style is still in service in a few select military units , some police, and is a widely accepted pistol for self-defense, regardless of the maker or size of the cartridge. Marines with 1911’s If you glance in the gun cabinet of many gun enthusiasts, you’ll likely see at least one 1911 pistol.  Many people own more than one because as far as pistols go, they are accurate, reliable, and pleasant on the eyes. Many of the major shooting sports also allow a class for shooting 1911 style pistols, because, even though the original design is well over 100 years old, it’s not going anywhere, anytime soon. 1911 Diagram In fact, if you were to look at one of Colt’s current offerings, the Model 70 ($900), it’s as close to the original M1911A1 as you can possibly get.  It’s as if it came out of the factory in 1924 when the 1911 was first reworked into the A1. Colt 1911 Series 70 Best 1911 Pistols First, let me start by saying that this is not an easy list to narrow down because there are so many excellent pistols being made by many different companies. Next, this list of firearms is chosen by me .  You obviously have your own opinion, which I want to hear too. 1911s with Lights & Lasers Finally, this list is meant to feature a wide variety of guns currently on the market and not just those made by Colt. And not just .45 ACP… 9mm vs .45 ACP $500-$600 Range: The guns at this level are NOT exceptional guns, but ones that will do the job and get better with a minimal amount of work. These are for people who want a 1911 but cannot afford to go out and buy an expensive, ready to roll out of the box, uber expensive 1911. 1. Rock Island Armory 1911 I shot my first  "Rock Island Armory" pistol during SHOT 2017.  I’ve always known them but never had a chance to try any out. Most Affordable 1911 Rock Island Armory 1911 520 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 520 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing And try out a lot I did.  My favorite was their longslide 1911 but their standard 1911 ($520) was great too. Sure, it needs some loving if you’re a little spoiled by other makers…but it went bang every time and when I did my part…hit all the plates.  They are designed by Armscor and manufactured in the Philippines.  A full review of the GI model here . Rock Island Armory 1911 GI Midsize They have plenty of other models too with the same good price points if you’re looking with something more…tactical. $700-$900 Range This is the most popular section of guns.  These are the ones that people can save up for over the course of time to get a gun that doesn’t need any work, but can still be customized into a beauty. 2. Springfield Armory Mil-Spec Springfield Armory makes great guns, even though many people believe they could do less stamping on them (think “Grip Zone” on the XD Mod 2). Springfield Armory Mil-Spec 699 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 699 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing The Mil-Spec ($729) doesn’t have any extra words on it and is a gorgeous firearm with a 5” barrel that’s available in stainless steel or with a parkerized finish. The fit is excellent and the finish is well done without any extra slag or burs on the slide or frame causing hangups. What’s your take on going with mil-spec for the 1911? Readers' Ratings 4.86/5 (1246) Your Rating? 3. Remington R1 Remington was one of the first companies to make the 1911 when Colt first asked them to help ramp up production during war periods. Remington R1 Enhanced 849 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 849 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The R1 Enhanced ($849) is a great deal considering and can be upgraded to whatever you want it to be. The capacity is 7+1 and the caliber is .45 auto traveling at 850 fps through a 5” sized barrel. $1,000-$1,400 Range At this point, the guns are as close to flawless as you can get before spending a fortune on a handcrafted 1911. The guns run fantastic and need nothing to make them perform better.  People still opt to do trigger work at this price, but it isn’t because the stock trigger is bad. 4. Springfield Armory EMP 3″ in 9mm Springfield 1911 EMP 9mm I own one of these 9mm 1911’s and have shot a lot through it for one year. Springfield 1911 EMP 1200 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1200 at Cabelas Compare prices (4 found) Cabelas (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Guns.com (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing As far as reliability goes, there is almost none better.  Since I’ve had it in my possession, I’ve not had a single malfunction with it…which is more than I can say for many other guns. And, accuracy out of the 3” officer sized barrel groups well at distances out to 15 yards, even when rapidly fired. Check out our full review here…and now with a full YouTube video too: 5. Colt Delta Elite (10mm) If you live in an area where 4-legged creatures are a threat, enjoy hunting with a handgun, or just like the 10mm cartridge for self-defense… Colt Delta Elite 10mm 1100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Colt’s freshly revised Delta Elite ($1100) may be what you’re looking for. The venerable 10mm outperforms most other self-defense cartridges for semi-automatic weapons, and, while it is a bit more expensive to shoot, it is quite versatile if you reload your own ammo . 10mm Round Please keep in mind that if the .45 ACP or .40 S&W recoil bothers you, you’ll need to stay away from 10mm, because it’s even snappier. The "Colt Delta Elite" ’s MSRP is just $1099 for the standard model, or you can spend $200 more and get the rail gun, to mount a light or laser below the 5” barrel. Want more 1911s in 10mm?  Check out our separate article . 6. Springfield Loaded Operator My first pistol ever was a Stainless Springfield Loaded ($849). Springfield Loaded with Recover Tactical Grips It probably wasn’t the smartest move for a first handgun …but it was just so pretty (and ran well too). But if I had to make my choice again with a ~$1000 1911 budget…I would choose the "Springfield Loaded Operator" ($1089). 1911 Editor's Choice Springfield Loaded Operator 1089 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1089 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing And that’s because it has everything I would want now that I’ve shot some more stuff. The Operator has the stuff that you can’t easily upgrade on a more standard 1911: Accessory Rail Awesome two-tone styling Night Sights 7. Colt Gold Cup Old school competition shooting at its finest. Colt Gold Cup Trophy 1400 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1400 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The Colt Gold Cup ($1400) series has tons of aggressive checkering on both the front and back strap, adjustable rear sights, and a fiber optic front sight.  Couple that with a match barrel and you’ve got something that will out shoot you any day. 8. Sig Sauer STX If you need a great 1911 for something like duty carry, you can’t go wrong with a Sig. Sig has a few models of 1911 that they offer, but the one to make this list is the STX. Sig Sauer STX 1911 1080 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1080 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Wide mag well, Nitron Stainless Steel slide, and custom Burled Maple grips complete the package. $1,500+ There are many 1911s that fall into this price range, with some costing several thousands of dollars.  This is the price point where custom makers begin to enter the market with absolutely gorgeous firearms with bells and whistles. 9. Springfield Range Officer (9mm) We wanted to include a 9mm single-stack 1911 on the list. Originally, I went with the STI Trojan, which has sadly been discontinued. Nothing else I’ve shot has beaten it yet, so if you can find one used, go for it! STI Trojan 9mm 1911 However, since it’s a little hard to get ahold of those… we’ve updated this list with our new pick–the Springfield Armory Range Officer ($830). If you’re looking for a 9mm competition pistol, the Range Officer is a performance machine . You get precision, reliability, and plenty of features you want–and nothing you don’t. The rugged, forged frame and slide mean that this baby won’t be letting you down any time soon. Not to mention, the Range Officer has some beautiful, classic styling you’ll love to hold in your hand. Springfield Armory 1911 Range Officer 9mm 830 at "Palmetto State Armory" Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 830 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing 10. Wilson Combat CQB with Rail If I had much more coin and wanted one of the best 1911s in my mind…I’d go with the Wilson CQB Tactical LE ($3100). Dream 1911 Wilson Combat CQB Tactical LE 3100 at Wilson Combat Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 3100 at Wilson Combat Prices accurate at time of writing I’ve built a couple 1911’s and always fall back to Wilson parts.  Every time I didn’t…I ended up junking that part and bought Wilson. Wilson Combat CQB with Rail and TLR-1 HL To me, the CQB has it all…the Wilson quality, rails, aggressive grips, and fiber optic sights. Wilson Combat 1911 Light Rail And now…I finally have one!  Full review coming soon… 11. Kimber Amethyst Ultra II Many of Kimber’s firearms are based on the 1911 platform.  They tend to be eye-catching and come in various sizes and calibers. "Kimber Amethyst Ultra" II 1400 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1400 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It’s hard to just pull one of their guns and focus on it, but one such gun of theirs is this Amethyst Ultra II ($1500). It is a sub-compact pistol with a 3” barrel chambered in 9mm or .45 ACP that is primarily geared to women who want a girly-looking gun…whatever their reason for that may be. If you’re looking for something more real-world for women, check out our Best Handguns for Women article. 12. Dan Wesson Bruin (10mm) Dan Wesson has long been a major name in the 1911 world with a host of great offerings – but the Bruin is our favorite. Maybe it’s the burnt bronze, maybe it’s the long slide, maybe it’s the 10mm of awesome…Ya, we love the Bruin. A duty carry finish and fiber optic sights round off this as not only an 1911 worthy of being a piece of art, but also ready for real use. "Dan Wesson Bruin" You might have heard that CZ bought Dan Wesson a few years ago and while many were worried that quality would suffer now that DW wasn’t a small shop anymore, we’re happy to report that people’s fears did not come true. CZ did not go the route of Freedom Group and Dan Wesson is still producing some of the finest 1911s you can get your hands on. The Wildcards Then, of course, there are guns that we’d all love to have, but would never take to the range to shoot simply because they cost as much as the things sitting in our driveway to get us from place to place. One such gun manufacturer is Cabot .  Cabot’s guns start with an MSRP in the $3,200 range, and travel up to 4.5 million dollars for a pair of meteorite-made 1911s, with every imaginable price in between. Cabot Meteorite 1911s, $4.5M If you can afford to shoot one of Cabot’s guns, I’m sure they work flawlessly ( or maybe not ).  I mean, for that price, they better work fantastically. Honorable Mentions Of course, I can’t hit all the 1911’s out there…but here are some honorable mentions for the higher end.  I hope one day to own some of these so I can chime in…but these have impeccable reputations! Nighthawk Custom Ed Brown The Best In Any Price Range: This list wouldn’t be complete if I didn’t talk further about modern-day Colt 1911s. While some enthusiasts will tell you that the R1 isn’t that great or that Kimbers are overrated, you rarely ever hear that about the original 1911 maker. In fact, the only complaint you do hear is that Colt’s 1911s are expensive . Colt Gold Cup While that may be true, they also tend to hold their value better than any of the other production 1911 builders. Furthermore, there are plenty of Colt 1911s available in the $800-900 range.  And you don’t have to go too far to look for them. Colt XSE Government Colt is one of the few firearms makers in existence who is still capable of selling you a firearm with the ability to resell it down the road and make money off it.  All in all, you get the best bang for your buck when you purchase a Colt 1911. They’re reliable, accurate, and have an excellent customer service base.  As a bonus the pistols are sexy. Conclusion The 1911 pistol is a beautiful handgun with a rich history that expands over 100 years. There is no sign of sales declining, and it seems that every year at SHOT Show, there is another 1911 maker entering the scene. If you are late to this game, I’m sure you’ll own one, one day…how could you not? Any we HAVE to put on the list?  Otherwise check out Best 9mm 1911s and Best 10mm 1911s …or even Best .45 ACP Ammo to feed your guns.

You Just Got an AR15, Now what? Necessary Upgrades

Guest Post by D.S. When you get your AR15, you either consciously or subconsciously, make a plan on what purpose that rifle will serve you. For some, you might be configuring a rifle that is best suited for target or varmint shooting. Others might be making a home defense rifle or a general purpose rifle, and some are of course making a rifle to fight the communist zombies that will invade our country full Red Dawns style. No matter what you are building, there are a few key components that you should have on most of your rifles. Optic: Guns are designed to shoot things, be it coyotes, squirrels, burglars, or communist zombies, you can’t shoot if you can’t aim. You need an optic, period. I know there are people who will say iron sights are perfectly fine, and I will agree with them, they’re FINE. And that’s “FINE” like when you piss your girlfriend/wife off and ask if she is okay and she says she is “FINE.” If irons were just as good as an optic, the military wouldn’t be spending a metric F*ckton on ACOG’s, Aimpoint’s, Eotech’s, etc. Hit percentages past 100 yards deviate strongly AGAINST the iron sights. From “Effects of Sight Type, Zero Methodology, and Target Distance on Shooting Performance Measures While Controlling for Ammunition Velocity and Individual Experience” You need an optic, so make it a good one. I know that money is tight and we can’t have an Aimpoint on one rifle, a Vortex Razor on another, and an Eotech and magnifier on the other, but have at least one gun with one quality optic. Aimpoint Pro’s are great and inexpensive comparatively, and Trijicon MRO’s are great and inexpensive comparatively as well. Red dots are going to get you better value to toughness vs a Low Power Variable Optic. So if you see yourself shooting 300 yards and in a red dot will suit your needs just fine. I just got a Trijicon MRO and I can already tell it’s worth it. Review to come. Trigger: Speed and Control. Triggers do great things for your performance behind the gun. Above: Geissele SSA Triggers are one of those things where a mil spec trigger is fine, and fine actually means fine. It will get the job done, you won’t be getting the best group out of it as it’s such a heavy and gritty trigger compared to nicer triggers that there could be more deviation in your trigger pull. A Geissele trigger is well worth the money, but again, I can’t afford to put that in every rifle. An ALG ACT trigger is a great mil spec upgrade and I would almost consider it a competition mil spec trigger. It’s smooth, has no creep or grit, no over travel on the reset, but still a 4.5lb trigger pull on the light spring and 6.5 on the heavy spring. For about 65$ I don’t think it can be beat. Review of that to come eventually also, sorry, dad responsibilities come before blog responsibilities. ALC ACT improved mil-spec trigger Light: I am a firm believer in every rifle needs a light, but that applies more to every home defense/general purpose rifle needs a light. A target rifle or varmint rifle most likely won’t need a light as I am unsure about the legality of shooting varmints past sun down with a flashlight. However, I also know that it’s illegal to shoot a family member sneaking into your house for whatever reason… and you shot them mistaking them for an Intruder. Involuntary manslaughter is a thing . Get a flashlight and make sure to identify what you’re shooting at. That’s part of the main gun safety rules. Know your target. Sling: Blue Force Gear Vickers Sling . One of my favorite slings EVER. I have mixed feelings on slings. I’m also left handed so that screws everything up with slings, they’re on the wrong side and can cause malfunctions, get in the way of my charging handle or mag release. Slings for a left handed person kind of suck, but I still want the ability to tighten the rifle to my body if necessary. I have a sling on my home defense rifle but it gets in the way and is annoying. But if I ever get knocked to the ground, I don’t want them to just take my rifle. Or for those of you who are preparing for a SHTF scenario, you will want a sling to carry other items as well as your rifle, maybe you need to carry water back to your camp, but need to have a way to protect yourself. There are a multitude of reasons to have a sling on your rifle, and there are a multitude of reasons to not have a sling on a rifle. I would say however have a way to attach a sling to all of your rifles, and have a sling. That way, you have the option to attach a sling if needed. And when you don’t want it, just disconnect it. Other Useful Crap: Anyways, other useful crap would be something along the lines of a new stock. Usually the basic stocks that come with the gun and good enough but leave you wanting more. Once you have everything you need on the rifle, upgrade the stock. Get a nice Magpul stock for 30$ or a really nice Magpul stock for 50$ or more, pick your flavor. Having an upgraded stock can make your life a little nicer. Another upgrade you can make would be a good hand-guard. You’re going to need a solid platform for your front sight and anything you might be putting on your hand-guard. Free float is a good option but you’re looking at 100$ minimum for a good rail, but it will be short, 150$ for a 12 inch hand-guard or longer. Free float rails seem to be a dime a dozen these days, but D.S. Suggests upping the budget to ensure you have a stable platform for accessories. The last two things that would make your life nicer are a charging handle and a muzzle device. I think a charging handle is more important than an upgraded muzzle device. As the standard A2 flash hider that comes on an AR15 does a very good job at hiding the flash, there really isn’t a need for a compensator as the 5.56/223 round is a very low recoil round. The trend towards pushing muzzle device cost towards a Benjamin Franklin is a little perturbing. These can usually wait. However the Bravo Company flash hider/comp combo is a very good option as is the VG6 Epsilon. Either will serve you well and be a well rounded muzzle device. I do believe that a charging handle upgrade is much more important because if your charging handle breaks, you will have a very hard time operating your gun. I prefer the Radian Raptor LT charging handle. It’s smooth to operate, and very durable, as well as ambidextrous which is nice since I am one of the weird left handed shooters. Recap I know this is a longer article with a lot of information in it, but the key takeaways from this article should be, get the 3 necessities first. Optic, light, sling. Then, you can start to upgrade your rifle with whatever your heart desires. Its when we upgrade too much though, that our rifle gets further and further away from the original lightweight, handy rifle that Eugene Stoner built. The AR15 is modular, adaptable, and extremely customizable which is what makes it such a great rifle that I think every individual should own and make it theirs. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

Better known as James Bond’s gun, the Walther PPK is now a 91-year-old handgun design and more of a collector’s item. A once very popular and the world’s first concealed carry handgun now remains a rare sight. But anyway, those who have them will need aftermarket parts at some point.